CVSA Evolves Free Driver Fatigue Educational Training Platform

CVSA Evolves Free Driver Fatigue Educational Training Platform

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is now home to the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP), offering a training tool to help combat truck driver fatigue.

Research in 2006 showed that numerous factors impact driver fatigue and motor carriers should consider certain factors in their safety programs, including:

  • driver health
  • environmental factors (such as cabin ergonomics and vibrations)
  • road conditions and seasonal variants
  • operational factors (scheduling practices, compensation, regulations, and safety culture)

In 2009, an operational field test with 77 commercial vehicle drivers in Alberta, Quebec and California found positive trends in sleep duration and sleep efficiency after implementing a Fatigue Management Program.

These trends include:

  • Improved reported sleep quality on duty days
  • 20 minutes longer main sleep on duty days
  • Improved duty day main period sleep duration and efficiency compared to rest days
  • Drivers reported less fatigue
  • Reduction in proportion of drivers reporting critical events (29% from 46%) and 40% reduction in number of critical events per km driven

To take advantage of these positive trends, FMCSA created the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP) with help from medical and sleep scientists from Canada and the U.S.

FMCSA has supported the NAFMP since its inception and looks forward to CVSA continuing to provide this important program to educate the motor carrier industry on driver fatigue.

What is the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP)?

NAFMP is a comprehensive educational and training program aimed at preventing fatigue-related risks and crashes and cultivating a corporate safety culture that proactively works to eliminate driver fatigue.

Learn how other drivers’ risky behaviors can affect your insurance rates.

At no cost or obligation, the comprehensive approach of the NAFMP combines effective fatigue management tools with education on what causes fatigue and how to minimize its occurrence.

You can use their e-learning platform to:

  • complete the training with interactive modules (containing exercises and quizzes)
  • or access on-demand downloads

Accessed through www.nafmp.org, the training is designed to build a safety culture and educate truck drivers, their families, carrier executives and managers, shippers and receivers, and dispatchers on identifying sleep disorders, treatment options and fatigue management technologies.

The 10 training topics include:

  • Fatigue Management Program introduction and overview
  • Safety culture and management practices
  • Driver education
  • Driver family education
  • Train-the-trainer for driver education and family forum
  • Shippers and receivers
  • Motor carrier sleep disorder management
  • Driver sleep disorders management
  • Driver scheduling and tools
  • Fatigue monitoring and management technologies

How will NAFMP likely change under CVSA guidance?

According to CVSA President Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol, “Offering the North American Fatigue Management Program as one of the Alliance’s driver-related educational programs helps us do our part to combat crashes caused by driver fatigue and exhaustion.”

In addition, CVSA plans to enhance, improve and grow the program by:

  • Hosting live and recorded Q&A sessions
  • Offering a moderated forum where users may ask questions and provide feedback
  • Offering information sessions at CVSA events and conferences
  • Hosting program and steering committee meetings to discuss program improvements
  • Offering webinars on various topics relevant to fatigue management
  • Offering Spanish content in addition to English and French

Learn more about the NAFMP and how to implement a fatigue management program by visiting the NAFMP website. Download a step-by-step implementation manual and register in the eLearning platform for the program courses.

DOT Compliance Programs (PSM)

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM),a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Driver Training Prevents the Biggest Unplanned Costs Affecting Fleets

Driver Training Prevents the Biggest Unplanned Costs Affecting Fleets

When it comes to driver training, the conversation at many fleets goes like this:

“What if we train everybody and they leave?” – CFO

“What if we don’t train them and they stay?” – CEO

Outside of normal trucking expenses (fuel, truck, and insurance), the biggest unplanned costs that can hit your company are issues that a focused driver training program could reduce or help prevent.

These unplanned costs include accidents, speeding tickets, roadside violations, impacts of poor CSA scores, vehicle maintenance issues, driver turnover, and eventual increased insurance rates.

As a business owner or fleet manager, you try to prepare financially for many of these costs. The problem is we often do not consider ways to prevent the costs in the first place or we consider the preventive measures to be too expensive or undervalued.

The CFO worries about the short-term cost of training drivers in a high churn industry but misses the long-term impacts of not training the 80% of their drivers that will stay. A good CEO can understand the short-term and long-term impacts of the entire picture.

You are probably starting to think:

  • What are the costs of a poor driver training program or not having one at all?
  • How much would a driver training program cost?

In this article we will discuss:

  1. Financial impact of trucking accidents on your business
  2. Truck driver training, driver turnover and the impact on CSA scores
  3. How to implement a customized driver training program

Driver training and the impact of Accidents

Every owner-operator understands that the insurance rates for their first 3 years will be high because new drivers with little driving experience have the highest risk of getting into an accident.

When there is an accident, the costs can be extremely high.

FMCSA data show us that there are more than 5,000 fatalities due to truck accidents each year, and more than 100,000 truck accident injuries.

In 2019, 11% of all crash fatalities were due to large truck crashes. If this accident was a multiple-vehicle crash, 23% of passenger vehicle occupant deaths stemmed from a large truck collision.

The reality is that many of these accidents could have been prevented with adequate truck driver training or on-going training after they receive their first job.  

According to the FMCSA, crashes are devastating in terms of fatalities and injuries, financial costs, damaged reputations, the inability to attract and retain good drivers, and general goodwill in the industry and community.

Specifically, let’s just look at the financial costs for large vehicle crashes:

  • The cost of all large truck crashes is about $91,000 per accident
  • A crash with injuries costs almost $200,000 per accident
  • A crash with fatalities costs around $3.6 million per accident

Immediately following a potential driver-at-fault accident, an accident driver investigations must occur, looking into their training history and if the driver satisfied all their training requirements.

Unfortunately, records associated with driver training are often doctored following an accident with the hope to provide a more favorable picture of actual training that occurred.

After the investigations, pre-employment violations are often found around driver qualification files and lack of previous employment history on record.

The best way to avoid collisions is to drive safely. The best way to monitor driver safety habits is measuring the ELD telematic data over time to show trends in a simple Driver Scorecard.

With a customized driver training program, red flags on these driver scorecards can immediately give the driver courses on defensive driving, fuel efficiency, HOS regulations, or driver ELD training.

Then, if an accident does happen, the fleet can show proof of focused on-going training.

Driver training and the impacts of Driver Turnover and CSA Scores

In 2020, the driver turnover rate at large truckload carriers averaged 90% while smaller truckload fleets faced a 69% turnover on average.

In some circumstances, there are even fleets facing a 200% or 300% turnover rate, meaning a driver could be recruited, hired, and onboarded in January and replaced at least twice by December.

In these cases, it makes sense why fleets fear spending money on training new and current drivers. The operational budget for trucks and tires come first before investing in company culture, safety, and on-going training.

In other words, high driver turnover causes pressures to quickly train drivers and push them on the road to get money flowing after losing the previous driver.

However, Vigillo—a data analyzing firm—completed a recent study that found a group of fleets with high driver turnover had 1,177 total crashes where fleets with low driver turnover had just 303 total crashes.

“There is a pretty strong correlation between the safety culture that exists at a motor carrier, which can be measured in CSA, and turnover rates,” said Vigillo CEO, Steve Bryan.

Their data revealed that fleets with high driver turnover had:

  • 189% more driver out-of-service rate
  • 300% more vehicle out-of-service rate
  • 181% more hours-of-service violations
  • 224% more crash indicators
  • 640% more hazmat violations, and
  • 182% more controlled substance violations

According to FMCSA annual violation data, fleets regulated by the DOT have paid over $27 million annually in fines, which breaks down to an average of $5,074 per case for violations. With HAZMAT, this average nearly doubles.

Many of these violations will also place the truck out-of-service until the issues are fixed. Being placed out-of-service for 10 hours while a maintenance shop is fixing the truck can cost a fleet around $900 more.

You can already see the cost benefits of reducing high driver turnover through positive company culture and a successful driver training program.

How to implement near-term customized driver training

Today, new technology and equipment analyzes and optimizes nearly every facet of fleet efficiency. This includes electronic logging devices, dashcams, and fleet management software that driver must be trained to use.

Each driver comes with their own experiences, skills, and flaws and these technologies can be used to understand your driver better.

For example, if driver trainers notice a habit of hard acceleration or hard braking, they should make sure a video training schedule includes driving fundamentals and defensive driving topics.

Similarly, if there is a pattern of logbook errors, include logbook training and hours of service rules into their video training schedule.

All custom training schedules should be accompanied by common new driver training, such as reviewing common maintenance and pre-trip inspection training, what to expect during a roadside inspection and how to treat inspectors, highlight drug testing processes and marijuana regulations, seasonal safe driving tips, cargo securement training, etc.

Customized training should also be measurable using quiz assessments to track driver performance. If their assessment score is low, then the training needs to be retaken.

Our DOT trainers offer a variety of in-person or online training courses tailored to the specific needs or weaknesses of your company and drivers.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA 2021 Operation Safe Driver Week Shows 31% Decline in Drivers Pulled Over

CVSA 2021 Operation Safe Driver Week Shows 31% Decline in Drivers Pulled Over

The goal of Operation Safe Driver Week is to discourage dangerous driving behaviors. This is accomplished through a heightened law enforcement presence on our roadways and increasing interactions between risky drivers and law enforcement officers.

This year’s Operation Safe Driver Week saw 17,910 passenger vehicle drivers (down 51% over last year’s program) and 28,148 commercial motor vehicle drivers (down 6% over last year’s program) from July 11-17.

LEARN MORE ABOUT CVSA OPERATION SAFE DRIVER WEEK, JULY 11-17, 2021 >>>

During this week in 2021, law enforcement issued 27,349 warnings and citations where last year they issued over 70,000 warnings and citations (a 62% decline).

For speeding, passenger vehicle drivers received 9,349 citations (a 35% decline over 2020) and only 2,929 warnings (a 71% decline over 2020).

On the other hand, commercial motor vehicles received 1,690 speeding citations (down 28% over last year) and 2,549 speeding warnings (a 26% decline over last year).

The top citations and warnings for CMV drivers were:

ViolationCitationsViolationWarnings
1. Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions1,6901. Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions2,549
2. Failure to use a seat belt1,225  2. Failure to use a seat belt954
3. Failure to obey traffic control device5223. Failure to obey traffic control device869
4. Texting/using a handheld phone3444. Texting/using a handheld phone336
5. Improper lane change1125. Following too closely310

Failure to wear a seatbelt was the second highest violation for both types of drivers and buckling up is the single most effective thing vehicle drivers and passengers can do to protect themselves in the event of a crash. Officers issued 1,355 citations and 354 warnings to passenger vehicle drivers, and 1,225 citations and 954 warnings to commercial motor vehicle drivers.

In addition to traffic enforcement, 2,469 motorists were assisted during Operation Safe Driver Week, highlighting law enforcement’s commitment to public service and roadway safety. Motorist assistance may include help fixing a flat tire, providing gasoline for a stranded vehicle, checking on someone who may be pulled over, assisting individuals in distress or experiencing a medical emergency, jump-starting a vehicle, traffic control, etc.

Why is CVSA Operation Safe Driver Week important?

This CVSA Program focuses specifically on drivers because drivers’ actions—whether it be speeding or just the failure to pay attention to driving—are responsible for most crashes and contribute to a staggering 94% of all traffic crashes.

Data shows that traffic stops and interactions with law enforcement help reduce problematic driving behaviors.

By interacting with drivers during Operation Safe Driver Week, law enforcement personnel aim to make our roadways safer by targeting high-risk driving behaviors.

  • Speeding has been a factor in more than a quarter of crash deaths since 2008. (Source)
  • Speeding of any kind was the most frequent driver-related crash factor for drivers of commercial motor vehicles and passenger vehicles. (Source)
  • Speeding was a factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities in 2018, killing 9,378 people or an average of more than 25 people per day. (Source)
  • Distracted driving claimed 3,142 lives in 2019. (Source)
  • Of the 22,215 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2019, 47% were not wearing seat belts. Seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives and could have saved an additional 2,549 people if they had been wearing seat belts, in 2017 alone. (Source)
  • Every day, about 28 people in the United States die in drunk-driving crashes — that’s one person every 52 minutes. In 2019, 10,142 people lost their lives due to drunk driving. (Source)

DOT Compliance Programs (PSM)

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM),a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

FMCSA Nominee discusses Safety Regulations, Driver Retention and New Entrant Programs

FMCSA Nominee discusses Safety Regulations, Driver Retention and New Entrant Programs

Serving as deputy administrator of FMCSA since January 2021, Meera Joshi is waiting to be confirmed as the next FMCSA administrator.

Prior to her nomination, Joshi served as chair and CEO of the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission, general manager of the New York Office of Sam Schwartz Transportation Consultants and was a visiting scholar at the New York University Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management.

The Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation could vote on her nomination any day, which would go to the Senate floor for official confirmation.

As we wait for her confirmation, let us look at what the future could bring for the trucking and transportation industry under her leadership.

What is the FMCSA focused on in the next few years?

With more than 500,000 interstate carriers and 4.7 million commercial driver’s license (CDL) holders across the nation, the FMCSA and its 1,100 employees will oversee significant changes for drivers and carriers. 

Joshi met with the senate committee on Sept. 22 where she shared her views on regulating the trucking industry, shortening detention times for drivers, roadway safety, and how technology will play a more significant role in the FMCSA approach to self-driving vehicles and increased artificial intelligence in trucks.

Infrastructure Bill

To begin, Joshi supports the bipartisan hard infrastructure bill that may be nearing approval. The bill will:

  • increase funding for FMCSA state partners to hire additional personnel for roadside inspections and reach the true breadth of the vast commercial motor vehicle (CMV) industry
  • provide FMCSA and states the opportunity to increase investigative and enforcement resources focused on high-risk motor carriers and in high crash zones
  • support essential upgrades to states’ IT infrastructure to improve CMV driver data collection and transfer, as well as allow for the integration of safety technology into CMV fleets

FMCSA Safety Regulations

When it comes to safety regulations, Joshi mentions four important priorities:

  1. Electronic transfer of license data between states: This rulemaking is in the final months of getting published for interstate cooperation as there needs to be swift and current data transfer between states around CDL licensure.
  2. Have state’s downgrade license if a positive drug test is submitted to FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse to keep risky drivers off the roads
  3. Strengthening FMCSA’s new entrant program
  4. Increase the scope of motor carrier investigations to encompass more at-risk behavior

As a new entrant, it is required to follow Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations and they will want to see some established records and processes during your New Entrant Safety Audit that will happen within the first 12 months of operation to complete the New Entrant Program.

Tips For New Drivers Rushing To Become Owner-Operators

Commercial Truck Driver Retention

When it comes to decreasing unpaid driver detention time, Joshi mentioned creating the financial incentives for shippers and port operators to decrease that time so that that financial burden doesn’t fall on truckers.

Lastly, about driver retention and capacity, Joshi mentioned the pilot program for the FMCSA to allow 18 to 21-year-old drivers to participate in interstate commerce apprenticeship programs. There are several provisions she mentioned with this program:

  • They must have a CDL license to begin with
  • There is an hours-of-service requirement
  • There is a safeguard within the legislation for termination, if there are any safety concerns, and
  • The program requires the FMCSA to do a very important study on driver compensation, including paid and unpaid detention time

DOT Training

All fleets need to conduct proper and thorough pre and post trip inspections, which consists of implementing quality:

  • driver training that is ongoing and consistent
  • driver education, and
  • driver awareness of current and changing traffic laws

All of this will help prevent being targeted by the DOT at roadside inspections and is a valuable resource to ensure a healthy fleet, and compliant safety practices.

Our DOT trainers offer a variety of in-person or online training courses tailored to the specific needs or weaknesses of your company.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Colorado is the earliest chain law state, starting September 1

Colorado winter tire chain law

Unpredictable weather systems can happen anytime, however snow often begins sticking to high-elevation routes in Colorado as early as mid- to late September.

According to Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), from Sept. 1 through May 31, all commercial vehicles traveling on I-70 between the Dotsero exit (mile point (MP) 133) and the Morrison exit (MP 259) must carry sufficient chains to be in compliance with the Colorado chain law.

For drivers and the public’s safety, it is important to use chains in compliance with Colorado’s chain law for commercial vehicles fitting into one of the following categories:

  • Vehicles with a gross combination weight rating of more than 26,000 pounds, inclusive of a towed unit, which has a gross vehicle weight-rating of more than 10,000 pounds
  • Vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds, or
  • Vehicles designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver

The fine for not carrying chains on I-70 between mileposts 133 and 259 from September 1 to May 31 is $50 plus a $17 surcharge. Statewide, the fine for not chaining up when the chain law is in effect is $500 plus a $79 surcharge. The fine for not chaining up and subsequently blocking the highway is $1,000 plus a $157 surcharge.

At a minimum, the CDOT will notify the public of the travel restriction with erected static and electronic variable message roadway signs. Additionally, CDOT may utilize radio channels, the official CDOT travel website (www.cotrip.org/), phone message system, email, text and other automated personal notification systems.


Driver Training: Free Estimate

Contact us with any questions. Our specialists are here to help you maximize your driver training.

Tire Chains Allowed in Colorado:

Metal chains must consist of two circular metal loops–one on each side of the tire–connected by not less than nine evenly spaced chain loops across the tread. Commercial vehicles that have four or more drive wheels must chain four wheels and dual tire chains are acceptable.

Alternate Traction Devices
Approved Alternate Traction Devices (ATDs) in Colorado are:

  • wheel sanders, which carry enough sand to get the vehicle through the restricted area
  • pneumatically driven chains, which spin under the drive wheels automatically as traction is lost, and
  • textile traction device (TTD), a fabric boot which encompasses the tire. Currently, the only TTD that has been approved for use on Colorado state highways is the AutoSock.

Tire Cables
With only two exceptions, Colorado chain law rules do not permit tire cables as alternate traction devices.

Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.

The exceptions are:

  1. tire cables with high strength steel cross member rollers 0.415″ or greater in diameter, which can be used on all commercial vehicles except single drive axle combinations; and
  2. on a tandem power drive axle commercial vehicle, where any type of cable can be used only if there are chains on the two outside tires of one of the power drive axles and cables on two or more tires of the other power drive axle.

 

Colorado Chain Law Levels

There are two levels for chain laws in Colorado—Level 1/Code 17 and Level 2/Code 18—and each level has specific conditions in which it can be implemented.

Chain Law Level 1/Code 17:
All single-drive axle combination commercial vehicles must chain all four drive wheels; cables are not permitted as ATDs. All other commercial vehicles must have snow tires or chains.

Level 1/Code 17 may be implemented any time there is snow covering any part of the traveled portion of pavement on an ascending grade.

Chain Law Level 2/Code 18:
All commercial vehicles must chain up. Single drive axle combination and tandem drive axle commercial vehicles must chain four drive wheels.

Auto-transports must comply to the extent possible without causing damage to hydraulic lines. Buses must chain two drive wheels to be DOT compliant.

Level 2/Code 18 may be implemented any time there is snow covering the entire traveled portion of pavement on an ascending grade, or when driving conditions dictate that this level is necessary to protect safety and to minimize road closures.

Be sure to review our complete guide on extreme weather and regulations affecting drivers this season.


DOT Training

All fleets need to conduct proper and thorough pre and post trip inspections, which consists of implementing quality:

  • driver training that is ongoing and consistent
  • driver education, and
  • driver awareness of current and changing traffic laws

All of this will help prevent being targeted by the DOT at roadside inspections and is a valuable resource to ensure a healthy fleet, and compliant safety practices.

Our DOT trainers offer a variety of in-person or online training courses tailored to the specific needs or weaknesses of your company.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Under 21 Driver Assessment Tool Shows Promise in Beta Test

Under 21 Driver Assessment Tool Shows Promise in Beta Test

“We need to find ways to expand the pool of safe truck drivers, and ATRI’s preliminary research indicates that safe, younger drivers can be found, “said Joyce Brenny, Brenny Transportation, Inc. CEO. 

ATRI, American Transportation Research Institute, released results of the Phase 1 Beta Test of its Younger Driver Assessment Tool exploring if an assessment tool to identify the safest 18-20 year old drivers is possible.

This is a critical step in expanding interstate CDL eligibility to younger drivers as the American Trucking Associations (ATA) have the driver shortage topping 100,000 by the year 2023 based on projected freight growth, industry retirements, and competition from other industries.

What is the trucking industry doing to attract younger drivers?

In hopes to increase the share of younger drivers in the industry, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) proposed an under-21 commercial driver pilot program allowing young drivers aged 18, 19, and 20 to operate commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in interstate commerce. Currently 18 to 20-year-olds are only allowed to operate intrastate commerce.

Additionally, the proposed infrastructure bill includes initiatives to grow the trucking workforce with an apprenticeship program for drivers younger than 21 to work in interstate commerce, addressing the growing truck driver shortage across the country. 

However, one of the concerns with opening the labor pool to younger drivers is that young people are more likely to engage in higher risk driving behaviors.

How will the trucking industry measure young driver safety risk?

Data from the U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) indicate that individuals under 24 years of age represented 18.4 percent of drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2017 while representing just 11.8 percent of the licensed driving population that year.

The beta test findings for the Younger Driver Assessment Tool provided limited support for the idea that low risk commercial truck drivers can be identified based on behavioral indicators in their Motor Vehicle Record (MVR) and Pre-Employment Screening Program (PSP) safety records.

In general, and counter to expectations, cognitive functioning was not reliably associated with histories of violations or crashes in the group of 16 drivers used during initial testing.

In the small sample, the truck driving safety profiles of current truck drivers—as measured by motor vehicle records and pre-employment screening data—can be differentiated based on personality traits, physiological characteristics, and aspects of mental health.

With expanded statistical validation, this methodology may be successfully applied to the assessment and selection of new entrants into the industry’s workforce, including younger drivers.

Ultimately, the goal of the assessment tool would be to secure younger drivers with the cognitive and mental attributes of mature, experienced drivers, which based on data implies that they are more likely to be safe drivers.

ATRI’s Phase II assessment will focus on a larger sample of young drivers by recruiting individuals in the 18- to 25-year-old age range from commercial driving schools.

Learn more about all levels of truck driver training and CDL permit test preparation that we offer at our CNS Driver Training Center.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

How Truck Drivers Can Optimize Fuel Efficiency

How Truck Drivers Can Optimize Fuel Efficiency

According to the American Trucking Association, drivers who practice fuel-efficient driving techniques use about 35% less fuel than those who do not.

Typically, fuel is the largest operating costs in a trucking company and the average truck today can consume more than 20,000 gallons of fuel a year, costing more than $70,000.

Multiply this by the number of vehicles in a fleet and you can grasp the importance of fuel efficiency for your employer.

Beyond using aerodynamic kits, saving fuel is not that difficult and slight modifications can help you achieve greater efficiency.

The secret of good fuel economy requires overcoming:

  • Rolling resistance
  • Air drag
  • Gravitational pull, and
  • Unintentional wastefulness

Below are proven techniques that drivers have used to improve fuel efficiency. Whatever kinds of loads you haul and wherever you normally travel, these fuel saving techniques will help you reduce the amount of fuel you burn.

 

Overcoming Air Drag

Air drag is the result of forces pushing back against the vehicle as it passes through the air and depends on speed, frontal area exposure, and external vehicle shape.

Air resistance is the most significant contributor to vehicle power requirements, especially over the speed of 50 mph.

Minimizing the height of the load will save fuel by reducing the air drag on the vehicle. Most tractor trailers have roof mounts that deflect airflow over the highest point at the front of the trailer load.

For approximately every three feet of frontal exposure of the trailer exposed to airflow, the fuel consumption will decrease by 0.1 mpg.

In addition to overhead deflectors, we see devices that seal the gap between the tractor and trailer, sealing the trailer underbody, and trailers adding a boat tail. These aerodynamic devices can reduce the horsepower required to move the truck by as much as 35 horsepower.

Fleets looking to streamline their vehicles will need to go through some trial and error to find a good fit. Once the aerodynamic devices have been installed, follow recommended upkeep and inspections on these devices.

Overcoming rolling resistance

As the second most significant contributor to vehicle power and fuel consumption, rolling resistance is the energy required to maximize the movement of tires on a roadway.

The factors that influence rolling resistance include:

  • tire pressure,
  • tire tread wear,
  • vehicle speed, and
  • weight

It has been demonstrated that checking tire pressure regularly and keeping an eye on tread wear can achieve up to 0.5 mpg as losing 10 pounds of tire pressure can lead to a 1% decline in fuel economy.

Speeds above 50 mph lead to more friction on the roads, higher tire temperatures, and reduced fuel economy. This leads to a decrease of 0.1 mpg for every mile per hour over 55 mph.

 

Overcoming gravitation pull

Overcoming or utilizing gravity to your advantage is most important during steep grades. When moving a loaded vehicle up a grade, the only variable you can influence is speed.

To improve fuel efficiency–in rolling terrain–use a light throttle and allow momentum to carry the vehicle over short grades.

In hilly and mountainous terrain, use the engine’s entire operating range before gearing down, where possible.

When cresting steep grades, use gravity to bring the vehicle back to the desired cruising speed.

Also, the type of cargo you haul and how heavy it is significantly affects fuel consumption. If the cargo is distributed correctly, the engine works less. So, do not overload any axles because for every 1,000 pound increase in vehicle weight, your fuel economy decreases by 0.5%.

You can improve fuel economy when you balance the load between your drives and trailer tandems with slightly more on your drive axles.

 

Overcoming unnecessary wastefulness

No matter how many years you have been driving, it is easy for drivers to develop inefficient driving habits, which includes:

  • driving with excessive speeds
  • excessive idling
  • operating the vehicle in the wrong gear, and
  • harsh acceleration or braking

It is the driver’s goal to arrive on time while incurring the least expense. Below are five ways to decrease wasteful driving habits.

 

Number one: Warming up the engine

The most underutilized fuel savings device on the truck is the engine.  When your engine is not operating at peak efficiency, there will be fuel loss.

To optimize engine economy, you need to:

  • conduct routine engine performance checks
  • regularly check your engine’s fluid levels (motor oil, coolant, and lube oil levels)
  • check to see if there are any fluid or grease leaking
  • check for worn hoses, electrical lines, belts, and inspect the air compressor

Coolant and lube oil operating temperatures can contribute greatly to fuel efficiency. Low coolant temperatures indicate the engine is too cold for efficient combustion. Lube oil below ideal temperature is more viscous and harder to pump. Oil above ideal temperature is too thin to lubricate properly.

An engine that is starved for air or unable to expel exhaust will lack power and waste fuel. Excessive fuel line restrictions will also reduce your miles per gallon.

When it comes to idling, today’s engine oils do not need you to warm up and idle your engine. Idling does not maintain the correct engine temperature and will dump oil into the exhaust manifold and turbo charger where it gets wasted.

In fact, idling can be harder on the engine than shutting it off or starting it up and can cost $3,500 or more in fuel per year.

As soon as the engine is running smoothly, you can head out slowly at first as the higher RPMs, the more fuel you will use.

Line-haul trucks not equipped with auxiliary power units might idle about 20-40% of the time the engine is running. If your truck does not have idle-reduction equipment:

  • Keep the heater or A/C off when not in your truck, then turn on the truck and do a pre-trip inspection so the cab is comfortable again
  • Turn off the engine whenever possible as idling longer than 10 seconds uses more oil than turning the engine off and back on
  • Use auxiliary heaters or fans in milder weather

 

Speed & Following Distance

Traffic conditions have a significant effect on fuel use. Every time you drop down a gear, fuel consumption increases. The more you brake, speed, or accelerate, the more fuel will be used.

When possible, using cruise control will help you optimize the amount of fuel needed for any given situation, thus improving fuel efficiency.

Be sure to allow at least 6 seconds between you and the vehicle in front of you, when possible. This will help you reduce the amount of times you need to fluctuate your speed.

 

Topping off your fuel tank

Over filling your fuel tank can overwhelm the evaporative system and could cause leaks due to excessive pressure in the system.

Since fuel expands when it is hot, the only way for the fuel to escape is through the breaker vent.

So, prevent topping off your fuel to increase fuel efficiency.

 

Turning

As you might have seen from the Mythbusters television show or UPS delivery statistics, avoiding left-hand turns conserves fuel, saves time, and avoids collisions.

UPS showed they could save over three million gallons of fuel with this technique.

When mapping out your last-miles off the highway, looks for ways to reduce left-hand turns.

 

Create a Driver Scorecard from ELD data

ELDs gather millions of data points that include dates, time, longitude, latitude, engine power status, odometer, engine faults, critical events data, harsh braking, hard turning, hard acceleration, HOS violations, idling, speeding, and more.

Many ELD providers, including our partner Pedigree Technologies, have created driver and safety scorecards that are easy to set-up, manage, and pull reports.

For example, Pedigree driver and safety scorecards include stats, such as:

  • # of HOS violations
  • Idling > 20min
  • Idling %
  • Hard Braking event
  • Speeding > 5mph
  • Fuel Efficiency
  • Heavy Acceleration event

These scorecards are point-based starting at 100 points and any selected stat can remove a certain amount of points based on the severity of the stat you are including in the scorecard. They can be customized further by adding a timeframe duration of the stat or distance traveled.

For example, a driver can lose 15 points for every time a hard-braking event happens every 100 miles.

Scorecard reporting can be customized by timeframe (the previous 7 days or month), selected vehicle or vehicle types (semi/long-haul trucks, medium-sized trucks, construction vehicles, etc), and more.

The Pedigree ELD reporting tool also shows if the driver has performed better or worse over the previous week or month.

Does your ELD provider offer similar reporting tools? If not, learn more about Pedigree Technologies

 

DOT Compliance Programs (PSM)

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM), a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.


10 Steps When Dealing With A Vehicle Breakdown

10 Steps When Dealing With A Vehicle Breakdown

As a truck driver, chances are you will face a vehicle breakdown, and nothing can be more frustrating and hazardous than being stuck on the side of the road.

In an emergency, you may have no choice but to stop in a dangerous place, which is why every truck driver needs to know what to do when dealing with a vehicle breakdown. 

We will quickly cover the three most common causes of a vehicle breakdown, how to prevent them, and what steps a driver should take when dealing with a vehicle breakdown.

 

Thorough daily inspections will reduce the chance of having a breakdown

The most important factor to reduce vehicle maintenance issues is conducting thorough pre-trip, post-trip, and on-route vehicle inspections on your truck and trailer.

Vehicle breakdowns can range from complications with tires, batteries, air leaks, running out of fuel, brakes, filters and additives, hoses, starters, alternators, lights, belts, sensors, and more.

The three of the most common issues are caused by tires, batteries, and brakes.

Tires

In the summer, you can expect most tire failures during the hottest time of day. If a tire is worn or compromised, hot roads will accelerate its wear and lead to failure.

A leading cause for tire blowouts is road hazards and underinflated tires are more prone to penetration. Unfortunately, a tire blowout can cause secondary damage that may increase repair costs and downtime.

In high heat, checking your tire pressure and wear during pre-trip inspections is critical. Remember, tires are designed to be porous and will lose about three pounds of air pressure each month.

During your daily inspections, be sure to check tire pressure, tread depth, and look for any worn sidewalls or objects in the tires.

Batteries

Truck batteries face different problems during the summer and winter months. In the summer, the heat can kill batteries 33% faster than in colder temperatures. In the winter, jumpstarts increase by almost 50%.

To minimize the need of jumpstarts, make sure that everything in the truck in turned off. Leaving your lights on or refrigerator plugged in can lead to unnecessary problems.

If a high draw on the battery happened recently, be sure to let the truck run for several minutes to let the alternator charge the batteries.

If the truck has been sitting for a few days, part way through the layoff be sure to start the truck and let it run for a while to keep the batteries charged.

Brakes

Brake violations and often the most frequent violation in roadside inspections. To prevent a vehicle breakdown due to brakes, regularly check the brake adjustment with the slack adjuster.

During your daily inspections, check to make sure brake chamber air lines are secure, able to flex, not leaking, free of mechanical damage and the seals on the glad hands and trailer side are in good condition.

How Successful Driver Training Programs Reduce Driver Turnover



What to do when a breakdown occurs

Eventually, all truck drivers will face a breakdown and must pull over on the side of the road. Below are 10 steps on what to do when a vehicle breakdown occurs.

  1. When pulling off the road, go for the widest part of the road you can find or pull over on an offramp versus the shoulder of a highway.
  2. When pulling over, turn on the flashers, and watch your mirrors to monitor the traffic behind you.
  3. Ease off the road slowly versus a hard turn to the side of the road.
  4. Once parked as far off the road as possible, exit the side of the cab away from road traffic, set up your flares and/or orange triangles behind the truck at 50 feet, 100 feet, and 150 feet, and put on a high-visibility vest if you have one.
  5. If pulled over on a hill, be sure to chock the wheels.
  6. Open the hood of your truck to indicate that you are broken down and will not be moving anytime soon.
  7. Determine what caused the problem and whether you need roadside assistance or you can limp to the nearest repair facility.
  8. If you have a dispatcher, call them to explain your situation so they can inform the customer that your load may be delayed, and see if there is a mechanic in the shop that can advise you on what to do next.
  9. Contact your truck insurance carrier for roadside assistance, if covered.
  10. No matter what, stay alert when pulled over on the shoulder of a road and remain in the vehicle as much as possible if waiting for roadside assistance.

DOT Training and Safety Meetings

Our DOT trainers offer a variety of in-person, or online training courses for the specific needs or weaknesses of your company, including daily pre and post-trip inspections.

Fleet management and driver training education is a very valuable resource to ensure a healthy fleet and compliant safety practices.

Our trainers can tailor training to your specific operation.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.


Interested in Training?


Why Reasonable Suspicion Training For Managers Is So Important

Why Reasonable Suspicion Training For Managers Is So Important

One of the most difficult things about reasonable suspicion testing for supervisors is the fear of being wrong when “accusing” an employee of using drugs or alcohol, but the profound impact on safety, well-being and productivity may outweigh those fears.

With the continued rise of the opioid epidemic amplified with the pandemic, marijuana legalization across the nation, and changes to DOT testing regulations, managers need to refresh themselves on the requirements and the importance of reasonable suspicion to keep the workplace safe.

Supervisors often fear being sued or having a labor grievance action brought against them because of their decision to conduct a reasonable suspicion test.

These fears can be minimized if supervisors remember that requiring an employee to submit to a reasonable suspicion test is not an accusation of drug or alcohol use, nor is it an attempt to diagnose substance abuse or addiction. Rather, it is a method for “ruling out” a possible cause or explanation for employee behavior or appearance that is cause for concern.

Federal (DOT) Regulations Around Reasonable Suspicion

Reasonable Suspicion Training is for supervisors and managers of any employee covered by company’s drug and alcohol policy, human resource managers or DERs, upper management, or anyone else responsible for safety within the company.

For the FMCSA, PHMSA, FTA:

  • They must complete at least 2 hours of supervisor training—one hour on signs and symptoms associated with drug use and one hour on signs and symptom associated with alcohol misuse.
  • For owner operators, if the wife is doing your books and manages while you are on the road, she should need this training. If the husband and wife both drive, they would both need the training as they are supervising while the other drives.

Even if the reasonable suspicion test cannot be conducted, the employer is still required to remove any employee from safety-sensitive duties whose behavior or appearance is indicative of being under the influence of or impaired by alcohol or drugs.

What is Reasonable Suspicion?

Reasonable suspicion is described as a set of circumstances that give you reason to conduct a “fitness for duty” assessment of an employee based on objective observations.

The suspicion is based on observations of the individual employee. It is not a generalized belief or “gut feeling” about a group or category of employees based on such characteristics as dress, ethnicity, age, or occupation. A reasonable suspicion is more than a hunch; it is a rational conclusion drawn from objective observations of the individual over a period of time.

Many people can confuse reasonable suspicion and probable cause, and there is a difference between the two. Probable cause generally implies that there is evidence to support a probable conclusion—e.g., drug or alcohol use. Reasonable suspicion leaves room for an action to “rule out” or eliminate a particular cause for the observed phenomenon. In other words, the reasonable suspicion test is used as much to determine that alcohol or drugs are not the cause of the observed behavior or appearance, as it is to prove that alcohol or drugs is the causative agent.

The supervisor’s role is to:

  • identify the specific observations of employee behavior or appearance that justify a reasonable suspicion test,
  • confront the employee concerning the requirement to undergo reasonable suspicion testing, and
  • fully explain the consequences of the employee’s refusal to comply.

Reasonable suspicion testing is used to determine that alcohol or drugs are not the cause of the observed behavior or appearance. Drug testing is a mechanism to determine if the employee has used a prohibited drug; regardless of when, or what amount.

The overall goal of Reasonable Suspicion Training is to protect public and workplace safety by ensuring the removal of employees from safety sensitive duties when their behavior and appearance indicate possible illegal drug use or alcohol misuse.

Basically, it gives a company eyes and ears throughout the workforce, with supervisors acting as the frontline defense for workplace safety.

The supervisor’s responsibility is to be alert to changes in the employee’s behavior and/or appearance, not to a specific set of symptoms associated with each drug or drug class.

Deciding that a reasonable suspicion test is necessary involves the supervisor’s specific interaction with the employee and should always be made based on current information. In the absence of current signs and symptoms, a reasonable suspicion drug test would generally not be merited on a past incident.

DOT Training and Safety Meetings

To teach you what the regulations say about how to handle reasonable suspicion, the process and documentation required, and tips to make sure you stay in compliance with those rules, our DOT trainers offer a variety of in-person, or online training courses for the specific needs or weaknesses of your company, including Reasonable Suspicion Training for managers.

Fleet management and driver training education is a very valuable resource to ensure a healthy fleet and compliant safety practices.

Our trainers can tailor training to your specific operation.


Interested in Training?


ELD Data Management Made Easy With Driver Scorecards

Telematics Data Management ELD Driver Scorecards

What can fleet managers do to encourage positive driver behavior?

Since most interstate trucking companies were required to add electronic logging devices (ELDs) to their trucks, back-office management has been given an opportunity to better manage their vehicles and drivers when it comes to violations, driving habits, audits, maintenance, and more.

ELD or telematic data management for trucking, construction, distribution industries, or corporate fleets should be formatted to highlight both efficiencies and deficiencies in simple customizable reports.

The best-practice telematics data management plan will measure the data over time to show trends and measure results. This is as simple as a Driver Scorecard for your fleet.

Create a Driver Scorecard from ELD data

ELDs gather millions of data points that include dates, time, longitude, latitude, engine power status, odometer, engine faults, critical events data, harsh braking, hard turning, hard acceleration, HOS violations, idling, speeding, and more.

Many ELD providers, including our partner Pedigree Technologies, have created driver and safety scorecards that are easy to set-up, manage, and pull reports.

For example, Pedigree driver and safety scorecards include stats, such as:

  • # of HOS violations
  • Idling > 20min
  • Idling %
  • Hard Braking event
  • Speeding > 5mph
  • Fuel Efficiency
  • Heavy Acceleration event
Pedigree ELD Driver Scorecard
Pedigree Technologies Driver Scorecard Tool

These scorecards are point-based starting at 100 points and any selected stat can remove a certain amount of points based on the severity of the stat you are including in the scorecard. They can be customized further by adding a timeframe duration of the stat or distance traveled.

Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.

For example, a driver can lose 15 points for every time a hard-braking event happens every 100 miles, or a driver can lose 5 points for any Hours of Service Util. % is under 75% per day.

Scorecard reporting can be customized by timeframe (the previous 7 days or month), selected vehicle or vehicle types (semi/long-haul trucks, medium-sized trucks, construction vehicles, etc), and more.

The Pedigree ELD reporting tool also shows if the driver has performed better or worse over the previous week or month.

Does your ELD provider offer similar reporting tools? If not, learn more about Pedigree Technologies


Further ELD Questions? Get a Free Demo

Contact us with any questions. Our ELD specialists can perform a demo with our ELD devices.

Use telematics data for customized video training

Using the telematics reports or driver scorecards can highlight which drivers are struggling in a given area.

For example, the driver scorecard can highlight a habit of hard acceleration and hard braking for one driver, while another driver has a habit of various HOS violations.

These red flags can immediately give the driver a defensive driving, fuel efficiency, HOS regulations, or driver ELD training in their video training schedule.

Customized training should also be measurable using quiz assessments to track driver performance and the ELD driver scorecard can be monitored for improvement after the training was completed. If their training assessment score is low or the habit continues, then the training needs to be retaken or a driver performance review could be scheduled.

Using telematics for driver incentive programs

Implementing ELD data management offers a range of cost-savings to your fleet, including decreased HOS violations and fines, decreased time spent by management monitoring driver behavior, decreased driver turnover or improved driver retention, and decreased risk of crashes and possible lower insurance premiums.

These savings can be given back to drivers through a driver incentive program.

Creating an incentive program around positive behavior has been shown to work for many fleets. Have your team discuss the various behaviors you want to reward and be creative on different ways to reward the good behavior.

For example, if a driver consistently has a great driver scorecard, or has shown improvement over time, the driver can receive a $50 gift card or add an hour of vacation time. The ideas here are endless.

Even a small investment to the driver’s benefit can go a long way.

If your fleet has a disciplinary policy, you can use the driver scorecard to measure clear expectations while drivers are on the road and what steps will be taken should a driver diverge from the policy.


Need help managing your ELD data?

Managing ELD data yourself can be confusing and stressful, and requires a much different back-office skill set than managing paper processes.

However, it does not have to be.

Whatever ELD system you have, we can manage it for you so you can start taking advantage of your ELD data.