CVSA Evolves Free Driver Fatigue Educational Training Platform

CVSA Evolves Free Driver Fatigue Educational Training Platform

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is now home to the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP), offering a training tool to help combat truck driver fatigue.

Research in 2006 showed that numerous factors impact driver fatigue and motor carriers should consider certain factors in their safety programs, including:

  • driver health
  • environmental factors (such as cabin ergonomics and vibrations)
  • road conditions and seasonal variants
  • operational factors (scheduling practices, compensation, regulations, and safety culture)

In 2009, an operational field test with 77 commercial vehicle drivers in Alberta, Quebec and California found positive trends in sleep duration and sleep efficiency after implementing a Fatigue Management Program.

These trends include:

  • Improved reported sleep quality on duty days
  • 20 minutes longer main sleep on duty days
  • Improved duty day main period sleep duration and efficiency compared to rest days
  • Drivers reported less fatigue
  • Reduction in proportion of drivers reporting critical events (29% from 46%) and 40% reduction in number of critical events per km driven

To take advantage of these positive trends, FMCSA created the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP) with help from medical and sleep scientists from Canada and the U.S.

FMCSA has supported the NAFMP since its inception and looks forward to CVSA continuing to provide this important program to educate the motor carrier industry on driver fatigue.

What is the North American Fatigue Management Program (NAFMP)?

NAFMP is a comprehensive educational and training program aimed at preventing fatigue-related risks and crashes and cultivating a corporate safety culture that proactively works to eliminate driver fatigue.

Learn how other drivers’ risky behaviors can affect your insurance rates.

At no cost or obligation, the comprehensive approach of the NAFMP combines effective fatigue management tools with education on what causes fatigue and how to minimize its occurrence.

You can use their e-learning platform to:

  • complete the training with interactive modules (containing exercises and quizzes)
  • or access on-demand downloads

Accessed through www.nafmp.org, the training is designed to build a safety culture and educate truck drivers, their families, carrier executives and managers, shippers and receivers, and dispatchers on identifying sleep disorders, treatment options and fatigue management technologies.

The 10 training topics include:

  • Fatigue Management Program introduction and overview
  • Safety culture and management practices
  • Driver education
  • Driver family education
  • Train-the-trainer for driver education and family forum
  • Shippers and receivers
  • Motor carrier sleep disorder management
  • Driver sleep disorders management
  • Driver scheduling and tools
  • Fatigue monitoring and management technologies

How will NAFMP likely change under CVSA guidance?

According to CVSA President Capt. John Broers with the South Dakota Highway Patrol, “Offering the North American Fatigue Management Program as one of the Alliance’s driver-related educational programs helps us do our part to combat crashes caused by driver fatigue and exhaustion.”

In addition, CVSA plans to enhance, improve and grow the program by:

  • Hosting live and recorded Q&A sessions
  • Offering a moderated forum where users may ask questions and provide feedback
  • Offering information sessions at CVSA events and conferences
  • Hosting program and steering committee meetings to discuss program improvements
  • Offering webinars on various topics relevant to fatigue management
  • Offering Spanish content in addition to English and French

Learn more about the NAFMP and how to implement a fatigue management program by visiting the NAFMP website. Download a step-by-step implementation manual and register in the eLearning platform for the program courses.

DOT Compliance Programs (PSM)

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM),a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

2021 CVSA Brake Safety Week: DOT Inspection Results

2021 CVSA Brake Safety Week: DOT Inspection Results

Nearly 4,000 commercial motor vehicles in the U.S. with critical brake violations removed from roadways during 2021 Brake Safety Week

During the annual CVSA Brake Safety Week enforcement blitz, from August 22-28, 2021, enforcement officials inspected 35,764 commercial motor vehicles across the U.S, Canada, and Mexico.

According to CVSA’s released data, 12% of the vehicles inspected were placed out of service (OOS) due to critical brake-related inspection item conditions until critical brake violations were corrected, much like the brake safety week results of 2020 and a slight decrease from the 2019 blitz.

The annual inspection blitz was conducted at fixed weigh stations, temporary pop-up inspection sites and during roving roadway patrols.

HOW TO PASS CVSA BRAKE SAFETY WEEK INSPECTIONS

What was the inspection focus?

According to the US federal regulations and the North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria, if your brake system efficiency falls below the minimum of 43.5%, your vehicle will be put out of service.

In Canada, 1,903 commercial motor vehicles were inspected. The brake-related out-of-service rate was 15.4%. The out-of-service rate related to brakes in the U.S. was 13.5% out of the 28,694 commercial motor vehicles inspected. And in Mexico, 5,167 inspections were conducted with a brake-specific out-of-service rate of 2.6%.

In addition, during Brake Safety Week, inspectors in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. recorded 5,667 brake hose chafing violations, which are a common brake-related violation, whether out-of-service or not. 

Inspectors focused on violations involving brake hoses and brake tubing, which resulted in identifying:

  • 1,970 violations – Wear extends into outer protective material, where applicable.
  • 1,730 violations – Wear extends through outer protective material into outer rubber cover.
  • 1,026 violations – Wear makes reinforcement ply visible, but ply is intact.
  • 567 violations (OOS) – Reinforcement ply is visible, and ply is completely frayed, severed, or cut through.
  • 374 violations (OOS) – Wear extends through reinforcement ply to inner rubber layer.

Why is CMV brake safety a big deal?

The CVSA brake safety enforcement and awareness campaigns are meant to remove unsafe drivers from roads and remind drivers that braking systems need to be checked regularly.

Brake-related violations accounted for more OOS vehicle conditions (26.5%) than any other vehicle violation during CVSA’s three-day International Roadcheck inspection in May.

According to the FMCSA latest “Large Truck and Bus Crash Facts” report, “Brake system” was the third most cited vehicle-related factor in fatal commercial motor vehicle and passenger vehicle crashes.

Regular checks help to preserve the safety of both the drivers and others on the road. Although this campaign had a specific focus on brake violations, inspecting the brakes is a normal part of procedure during roadside inspections.

Stay DOT compliant

Knowing what your CSA score is and how it affects your company and all of the requirements to pass inspections, whether it be for brake safety or suspension and steering, will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road and pass all truck inspections.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Surprise CVSA HAZMAT Road Blitz Found 14% Violations in June 2021

Motor carriers whose drivers transport hazardous materials/dangerous goods are specially trained in emergency safety and applicable HM/DG federal regulations.

During the surprise five-day CVSA 2021 HM/DG Road Blitz in June, inspectors spotlight safety-compliant drivers, shippers and motor carriers with vehicles containing hazardous materials/dangerous goods to ensure everything is appropriately marked, placarded, packaged, and secured while being transported on our roadways.

Any vehicles found to have HM/DG out-of-service (OOS) violations, or any other driver/vehicle OOS violations, were restricted from traveling until all OOS violations were addressed.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OTHER CVSA INSPECTIONS

How many CMVs were stopped, inspected, and cited violations?

In the U.S. and Canada, 10,905 commercial motor vehicles and 8,363 HM/DG packages were inspected over that five-day period. Inspectors identified 2,714 violations, which included:

  • 496 shipping papers violations
  • 628 non-bulk/small means of containment packaging violations
  • 390 bulk packaging/large means of containment placarding violations
  • 277 non-bulk/small means of containment labeling violations
  • 307 bulk/large means of containment placarding violations
  • 167 other safety marks violations
  • 288 loading and securement violations
  • 50 HM/DG package integrity (leaking) violations

Below is a summary of the HM/DG class types inspected.

Class DescriptionCanadaMexicoU.S.Total
Class 1Explosives, such as ammunition, fireworks, flares, etc.11590317522
Class 2Flammable, non-flammable/non-poisonous and poisonous.2863671,5642,217
Class 3Flammable liquids, such as acetone, adhesives, paints, gasoline, ethanol, methanol, some pesticides, etc.4841, 5263,1405,150
Class 4Flammable solids, substances liable to spontaneously combust and substances that, on contact with water, emit flammable gases, such as white phosphorus and sodium.10217133252
Class 5Oxidizing agents and organic peroxides, such as hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium nitrite, ammonium nitrate fertilizers and oxygen generators.11026203339
Class 6Toxic and infectious substances; any material, other than a gas, that is so toxic to humans that it presents a health hazard during transportation, such as cyanide, biological samples, clinical wastes and some pesticides.11339120272
Class 7Radioactive materials, such as cobalt and cesium.96240138
Class 8Liquid or solid corrosive substances, such as sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide, that cause full thickness destruction of human skin at the site of contact within a specified time.1921601,1491,501
Class 9Miscellaneous HM/DG, such as acetaldehyde ammonia, asbestos, elevated temperature materials and benzaldehyde.114146430690

The CVSA HM/DG Road Blitz helps increase awareness of the hazardous materials/dangerous goods rules and regulations in place to keep the driver, the public and the environment safe.

Hazmat and DOT Training

At CNS, we are fully capable to handle your HAZMAT compliance training or other DOT training.

There are many rules, regulations, and requirements in each state for authorities to keep track of when it comes to hauling hazardous material. If you are not DOT compliant, it could be detrimental to your company, as fines and penalties can be upwards of $180,000.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA 2021 Operation Safe Driver Week Shows 31% Decline in Drivers Pulled Over

CVSA 2021 Operation Safe Driver Week Shows 31% Decline in Drivers Pulled Over

The goal of Operation Safe Driver Week is to discourage dangerous driving behaviors. This is accomplished through a heightened law enforcement presence on our roadways and increasing interactions between risky drivers and law enforcement officers.

This year’s Operation Safe Driver Week saw 17,910 passenger vehicle drivers (down 51% over last year’s program) and 28,148 commercial motor vehicle drivers (down 6% over last year’s program) from July 11-17.

LEARN MORE ABOUT CVSA OPERATION SAFE DRIVER WEEK, JULY 11-17, 2021 >>>

During this week in 2021, law enforcement issued 27,349 warnings and citations where last year they issued over 70,000 warnings and citations (a 62% decline).

For speeding, passenger vehicle drivers received 9,349 citations (a 35% decline over 2020) and only 2,929 warnings (a 71% decline over 2020).

On the other hand, commercial motor vehicles received 1,690 speeding citations (down 28% over last year) and 2,549 speeding warnings (a 26% decline over last year).

The top citations and warnings for CMV drivers were:

ViolationCitationsViolationWarnings
1. Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions1,6901. Speeding/basic speed law/driving too fast for conditions2,549
2. Failure to use a seat belt1,225  2. Failure to use a seat belt954
3. Failure to obey traffic control device5223. Failure to obey traffic control device869
4. Texting/using a handheld phone3444. Texting/using a handheld phone336
5. Improper lane change1125. Following too closely310

Failure to wear a seatbelt was the second highest violation for both types of drivers and buckling up is the single most effective thing vehicle drivers and passengers can do to protect themselves in the event of a crash. Officers issued 1,355 citations and 354 warnings to passenger vehicle drivers, and 1,225 citations and 954 warnings to commercial motor vehicle drivers.

In addition to traffic enforcement, 2,469 motorists were assisted during Operation Safe Driver Week, highlighting law enforcement’s commitment to public service and roadway safety. Motorist assistance may include help fixing a flat tire, providing gasoline for a stranded vehicle, checking on someone who may be pulled over, assisting individuals in distress or experiencing a medical emergency, jump-starting a vehicle, traffic control, etc.

Why is CVSA Operation Safe Driver Week important?

This CVSA Program focuses specifically on drivers because drivers’ actions—whether it be speeding or just the failure to pay attention to driving—are responsible for most crashes and contribute to a staggering 94% of all traffic crashes.

Data shows that traffic stops and interactions with law enforcement help reduce problematic driving behaviors.

By interacting with drivers during Operation Safe Driver Week, law enforcement personnel aim to make our roadways safer by targeting high-risk driving behaviors.

  • Speeding has been a factor in more than a quarter of crash deaths since 2008. (Source)
  • Speeding of any kind was the most frequent driver-related crash factor for drivers of commercial motor vehicles and passenger vehicles. (Source)
  • Speeding was a factor in 26% of all traffic fatalities in 2018, killing 9,378 people or an average of more than 25 people per day. (Source)
  • Distracted driving claimed 3,142 lives in 2019. (Source)
  • Of the 22,215 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2019, 47% were not wearing seat belts. Seat belts saved an estimated 14,955 lives and could have saved an additional 2,549 people if they had been wearing seat belts, in 2017 alone. (Source)
  • Every day, about 28 people in the United States die in drunk-driving crashes — that’s one person every 52 minutes. In 2019, 10,142 people lost their lives due to drunk driving. (Source)

DOT Compliance Programs (PSM)

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM),a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA International Truck Inspection Results For 2021

CVSA truck inspection results

On May 4-6, 2021—as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck—40,000+ truck inspections were conducted, removing 6,710 commercial vehicles and 2,080 drivers from roads across the US and Canada.

The International Roadcheck is conducted annually and is meant to remove unsafe commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and drivers from roads. During this 72-hour inspection, 16.5% of vehicles and 5.3% of drivers were placed out of service. In comparison, last year’s Roadcheck in late September 2020 had a vehicle out-of-service rate of 22.2% and a driver out-of-service rate of 5.3%.

The basis for violations comes from the CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria.

What are the levels for CVSA Truck Inspections?

There are eight different levels of inspection that the CVSA follows, however the truck inspections in this roadcheck were only subjected to the North American Standard (NAS) Level I, II, and III Inspections.

  • NAS Level I Inspection—includes a 37-step procedure examining the driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness.
  • NAS Level II Inspection—includes anything that can be inspected without getting under the CMV.
  • NAS Level III Inspection—includes a review of driver requirements, such as the license, cargo and vehicle documentation, record of duty status, seat belt usage, etc.

There were over 23,135 Level I Inspections conducted, removing 5,048 vehicles (21.8%) and 1,200 (5.2%) drivers from roadways.

There were over 9,410 Level II Inspections conducted, removing 1,593 vehicles (16.9%) and 549 (5.8%) drivers from roadways.

There were over 6,836 Level III Inspections conducted, removing 331 (4.8%) drivers from roadways.

What was the focus of CVSA Truck Inspections?

For 2021, CVSA truck inspections focused on violations related to hours of service and lighting, which resulted in identifying:

  • 1,203 hours of service violations or 41.5% of all driver out-of-service violations
  • 1,367 lighting violations or 14.1% of all vehicle out-of-service violations

What are the CVSA International Truck Inspection Results?

The results for inspections are summarized below and include out-of-service vehicle, CMV driver, seatbelt, hazardous materials/dangerous goods and motorcoach violations.

There were 9,691 vehicles placed out-of-service with the top violation being for braking systems (26.5%). The list below summarizes the remainder of recorded vehicle violations.

Out-of-service vehicle violations:

Vehicle violation categoryNumber of violationsPercent of out-of-service violations
Braking systems256426.5%
Tires and wheels180418.6%
Brake adjustment120312.4%
Cargo securement119212.3%
Lighting devices136714.1%

There were 2,898 drivers placed out-of-service with the top violation being for hours of service. The list below summarizes the remainder of recorded driver violations.

Driver out-of-service violations:

Driver violation categoryNumber of violationsPercent of out-of-service violations
Hours of Service1,20341.5%
Wrong Class License56519.5%
False Logs42714.7%
Other48216.6%
Suspended License1324.6%

Stay DOT compliant

Knowing what your CSA score is and how it affects your company and all of the requirements to pass inspections, whether it be for brake safety or suspension and steering, will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road and pass all truck inspections.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA INTERNATIONAL ROADSIDE DOT INSPECTION READINESS (2021)

DOT Audit | DOT Compliance Services | CNS

2021 DOT Inspection Readiness 

The annual International Roadcheck conducted by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA)  is a high-visibility reminder of the importance of commercial motor vehicle safety. The 2021 International Roadcheck is scheduled for May 4-6, 2021.

Last year’s blitz showed that the top violations putting drivers out of service were Hours-of-Service (HOS) violations, accounting for 34.7% of all driver out-of-service conditions.

Review some of the CVSA Inspection Results from 2019

DOT inspection focus for 2021 International Roadcheck

Primarily, the International Roadcheck conducts the North American Standard (NAS) Level I Inspection, which includes 37 steps in two main inspection categories:

  • driver operating requirements
  • vehicle mechanical fitness
  • Note: hazardous materials/dangerous goods are sometimes part of a Level I inspection

Depending on other factors, an inspector could conduct a:

  • Level II inspection (walk-around driver/vehicle)
  • Level III inspection (driver/credential/administrative) and/or
  • Level IV inspection (vehicle-only)

Each year, there is also a special category focus. This year’s CVSA Roadcheck focus is on lights and hours-of-service (HOS) violations.

To keep fatigued drivers off the road, hour-of-service regulations limit how long and when a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver can drive and regulates the minimum amount of time drivers must rest between driving shifts.

>>> Download the 2021 International Roadcheck emphasis areas flyer <<<

Lighting devices include headlamps, tail lamps, clearance lamps, identification lamps, license plate and side marker lamps, stop lamps, turn signals and lamps on projecting loads.

All required lighting devices are inspected for proper color, operation, mounting and visibility. In addition, the condition and location of reflectors and retroreflective sheeting are also inspected.

The top vehicle violation in the U.S. in fiscal 2020 was an inoperable required lamp, accounting for 12.2% of all vehicle violations and 4.4% of all out-of-service vehicle violations. Moreover, taking into account all possible lighting-related violations issued in fiscal 2020, one in four vehicles chosen for inspection (25.3%) were issued a lighting-related violation.

Slightly more than one in seven out-of-service violations (16.4%) in the U.S. were lighting related. These violations can be largely avoided by checking the condition and location of reflectors and retroreflective sheeting, and by checking all required lamps/turn signals mentioned above and ensuring they are operative, properly mounted and not obscured in any way.

What to expect during the CVSA International Roadcheck

At a minimum, drivers should anticipate the following procedures during a roadside DOT inspection:

  • inspector greeting, interview, driver preparation
  • collection/verification of driver documents
  • motor carrier ID
  • license examination
  • records check (duty status and periodic inspection reports)
  • certification check (if needed)
    • Medical Examiner’s Certificate
    • Skill Performance Evaluation Certification, and
    • daily vehicle inspection report
  • other inspections such as driver seat belt usage, illness, fatigue, impairments due to substance use

A roadside DOT inspection would include critical components such as:

  • brake systems
  • cargo securement
  • coupling devices
  • driveline/driveshaft components
  • driver’s seat (missing)
  • exhaust systems
  • frames
  • fuel systems
  • lighting devices
  • steering mechanisms
  • suspension system
  • tires
  • van and open-top trailer bodies
  • wheels, rims, and hubs
  • windshield wipers
  • Buses, motor coaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles: emergency exits, electrical cables and systems in engine and battery compartments, and temporary and aisle seating

Although this 3-day event spanning from Canada to Mexico intensifies the frequency of inspections, it’s crucial to remember that DOT inspections happen every day of the year.

The FMCSA 2019 data reports 3.36 million inspections last year, with only 67,072 (or, about 2%) happening during the International Roadcheck. The annual data show 944,794 driver violations, with just over 20% (195,545) being for out-of-service conditions.

Obeying safety standards and being prepared for inspection at any time of the year is a vital aspect of any driver’s protocol.

What are CVSA Standards for critical violations?

The basis for violations comes from the CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria.

There are eight different levels of inspection the CVSA follows. However, truck inspections in the 2019 Roadcheck were only subjected to the North American Standard (NAS) Level I, II and III Inspections.

Out-of-service orders and the number, type and severity of safety violations affect a motor carrier’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) score and its Safety Fitness Determination (SFD) rating.

 


DOT Audits

We can perform a mock audit for you

You can stay ahead of the FMCSA by ensuring your drivers are in compliance before sending them out on the road. We offer many services, but one specifically—DOT Mock Audits—help trucking companies operate with the confidence that they will pass any audits or inspections the FMCSA throws at them.

Basically, in a DOT Mock Audit, we send out a specialist that will conduct an audit in the exact same way a DOT officer would. This can help keep you prepared for any surprise roadside inspection or any future actual DOT audits, and you can be sure that they will happen.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road and pass all DOT inspections.

For any assistance related to DOT Audits, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

 

2020 CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria


Starting today, April 1, 2020, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) 2020 North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria is now in effect. The 2020 out-of-service criteria replaces and supersedes all previous versions.

The North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria (OOSC) is the pass-fail criteria for roadside safety inspections. The purpose of the criteria is to identify critical safety violations. Those violations render the driver, vehicle and/or motor carrier out of service until the condition(s) or violation(s) are corrected or repaired.

HOW TO PASS ROADSIDE INSPECTIONS DURING CVSA BRAKE SAFETY WEEK

In accordance with CVSA Bylaws, the proposed changes were communicated to the voting members of the Alliance on Oct. 15, 2019 and were ratified on Nov. 1, 2019. There was an additional ballot clarification regarding OOSC Ballot Item #2 which was communicated to the membership on Dec. 10, 2019 and ratified on Dec. 20, 2019. The following changes were made to the out-of-service criteria:

  1. Modified the subtitle in Part I, Item 2. Operator’s/chauffeur’s license or permit (non-CDL), a. Vehicle 26,000 lbs. Or less GVWR not designed to transport 16 or more passengers or placarded loads of hazardous materials.
  2. Included information outlining a valid Canadian dangerous goods training certificate to Part I, Item 2. Operator’s/chauffeur’s license or permit (non-CDL), b. Endorsements and restrictions and Part I, item 3. Commercial driver’s license (CDL), c. Endorsements and restrictions.
  3. Amended Part I, Item 7. Drugs and other substances; as identified under section 392.4(a) by adding OOSC regarding the FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse and removing “as identified under section 392.4(a)” from the title.

    Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.
  4. Removed the reference to an AOBRD in Footnote 14 and added a note for Footnotes 11-14. Part I, Item 9. Driver’s record of duty status – US – footnotes for driver’s record of duty status – US
  5. Removed the out-of-service condition of 72 hours for no log from Part I, Item 10. Driver’s record of duty status – Canada, h. No daily log (See Footnote 2).
  6. Amended Part I, Item 10. Driver’s record of duty status – Canada – footnotes for driver’s record of duty status – Canada, Footnote 2, to reduce the amount of time a driver can be behind on his/her daily log and not be declared out of service.
  7. Updated Part I, Item 11. Driver’s record of duty status – Mexico by replacing the OOSC for Mexico to reflect the requirements in the NOM-087-SCT-2-2017 and adding footnotes.
  8. Added the new SAE J2899 markings found on brake chambers to Part II, Item 1. Brake systems, a. Defective brakes, Brake Adjustment Reference Charts (Clamp Type).
  9. Clarified in Part II, Item 1. Brake systems, e. Parking brake that a parking brake needs to be held by mechanical means.
  10. Amended Part II, Item 11. Suspensions, d. Suspension connecting rod, tracking component assembly or sway bar components by removing sway bars from the OOSC.
  11. Clarified in Part II, Item 12. Tires, a. Any tire on any steering axle(s) of a power unit, (9) and b. All tires other than those found on the front steering axle(s) of a powered unit that the condition refers to a wheel end of a vehicle.
  12. Amended Part II, Item 16. Buses, motorcoaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles – emergency exits/electrical cables and systems in engine and battery compartments/seating (temporary and aisle seats) by adding OOSC for emergency exits that are marked but not necessarily required.
  13. Amended Part III, Item 3. Bulk packages, c. Bulk package authorization by modifying the title and out-of-service condition to include Canadian terminology.
  14. Added a note regarding manhole covers to Part III, Item 3. Bulk packages, d. Venting devices, manhole covers, fill/inspection openings and discharge valves.
  15. Modified the title and condition in Part III, Item 6. Non-bulk packaging to include Canadian terminology.
  16. Added a condition to Part III, Item 10. Emergency response assistance plan (ERAP) (in Canada only) by outlining that ERAP information must be on the shipping document.

For more information, CVSA provides a document that outlines each of the above-mentioned amendments, along with a detailed description of the rationale behind each change.

CVSA Postpones International Roadcheck


Now Scheduled for Sept. 9-11

Every year, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) sets inspection and enforcement initiatives, such as International Roadcheck, which was scheduled for May 5-7.

However, with public health and safety as its top concern, CVSA has decided to postpone International Roadcheck to later in the year, now scheduled for Sept. 9-11.

The Alliance will monitor the status of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and appropriately select the new dates when it’s safe and reasonable to do so.

Roadside safety inspections and traffic enforcement will continue to be conducted every day, with enforcement personnel following their departmental health and safety policies and procedures, as appropriate.

>>> Stay prepared for roadside inspections <<<

“As we urgently respond to this time-sensitive crisis, we must remain diligent and committed to ensuring that the commercial motor vehicles and drivers providing essential goods and services to our communities are following motor carrier safety regulations,” said CVSA President Sgt. John Samis with the Delaware State Police. “Safety doesn’t take a break. It is always our top priority.”

Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.

“International Roadcheck has run on-schedule for the past 32 years so its postponement was thoroughly and thoughtfully discussed before we made this decision, but it wasn’t a difficult decision to make,” said Sgt. Samis. “This experience is unprecedented in our modern society and we need to do all that we can to help stop the spread of this global pandemic.”

At this time, International Roadcheck is the only public enforcement initiative that has been postponed. Operation Safe Driver Week is still scheduled for July 12-18 and Brake Safety Week is still set for Aug. 23-29.

CVSA will closely monitor the coronavirus outbreak, follow guidance from public health expert leadership, and promptly notify the membership and industry stakeholders of the rescheduled International Roadcheck dates and the status of future scheduled enforcement campaigns.

For up-to-date information on coronavirus and guidance on this rapidly evolving situation, visit the website for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For Canada, visit the Public Health Agency of Canada’s website. In Mexico, visit the government of Mexico’s website. Visit the World Health Organization’s website for a worldwide update on the coronavirus pandemic.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA International Roadside DOT Inspection Readiness (2020)

DOT Inspection

2021 DOT Inspection Readinessscheduled for May 4-6

The annual International Roadcheck—conducted by the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) in late this year—is a high-visibility reminder of the importance of commercial motor vehicle safety. The 2020 International Roadcheck is now scheduled for Sept. 9-11.

Let’s review a few important notes and changes for the 2020 International Roadcheck.

Date change for 2020 International Roadcheck

Historically, the International Roadcheck has happened the first week of June. In 2020, the DOT inspection dates planned to have been moved up a month to take advantage of potentially more favorable weather conditions.

This year, the CVSA’s International Roadcheck was supposed to happen May 5-7, 2020, but was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic, and is now re-scheduled for Sept. 9-11.

Law enforcement will also be paying closer attention to unsafe driving behaviors of both truck and car drivers July 12-18 as part of the CVSA Operation Safe Driver Week.

Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.

In July, more than 10,000 citations, warnings issued to truckers during Operation Safe Driver Week, mostly for speeding and seat belts.

Also, the annual Brake Safety Week enforcement blitz is scheduled for August 23-29, 2020 with no plans of being postponed this year.

“During last year’s International Roadcheck inspection and enforcement initiative, brake system and brake adjustment violations accounted for 45.1% of all out-of-service conditions. That’s more than any other vehicle violation category. And during last year’s Brake Safety Week, 13.5% of the commercial motor vehicles inspected had brake-related vehicle inspection item violations and were placed out of service,” the CVSA statement reported.

DOT inspection focus for 2020 International Roadcheck

Primarily, the International Roadcheck conducts the North American Standard (NAS) Level I Inspection, which includes 37 steps in two main inspection categories:

  • driver operating requirements
  • vehicle mechanical fitness
  • Note: hazardous materials/dangerous goods are sometimes part of a Level I inspection

Depending on other factors, an inspector could conduct a:

  • Level II inspection (walk-around driver/vehicle)
  • Level III inspection (driver/credential/administrative) and/or
  • Level IV inspection (vehicle-only)

Each year, there is also a special category focus. This year’s now-postponed Roadcheck focus is on the driver requirements category.

This includes driver CDLs, medical cards, seat belts, records of duty status, ELD compliance and more – during the 72-hour ramp-up in enforcement.

>>> Download 2020 International Roadcheck Driver Requirements <<<

CVSA’s President, Sgt. John Samis of the Delaware State Police, commented that due to the US Federal mandate for electronic logging device compliance, “this year’s International Roadcheck would be the perfect opportunity to revisit all aspects of roadside DOT inspection driver requirements.”

What to expect during the CVSA International Roadcheck

At a minimum, drivers should anticipate the following procedures during a roadside DOT inspection:

  • inspector greeting, interview, driver preparation
  • collection/verification of driver documents
  • motor carrier ID
  • license examination
  • records check (duty status and periodic inspection reports)
  • certification check (if needed)
    • Medical Examiner’s Certificate
    • Skill Performance Evaluation Certification, and
    • daily vehicle inspection report
  • other inspections such as driver seat belt usage, illness, fatigue, impairments due to substance use

A roadside DOT inspection would include critical components such as:

  • brake systems
  • cargo securement
  • coupling devices
  • driveline/driveshaft components
  • driver’s seat (missing)
  • exhaust systems
  • frames
  • fuel systems
  • lighting devices
  • steering mechanisms
  • suspension system
  • tires
  • van and open-top trailer bodies
  • wheels, rims, and hubs
  • windshield wipers
  • Buses, motor coaches, passenger vans or other passenger-carrying vehicles: emergency exits, electrical cables and systems in engine and battery compartments, and temporary and aisle seating

Although this 3-day event spanning from Canada to Mexico intensifies the frequency of inspections, it’s crucial to remember that DOT inspections happen every day of the year.

The FMCSA 2019 data reports 3.36 million inspections last year, with only 67,072 (or, about 2%) happening during the International Roadcheck. The annual data show 944,794 driver violations, with just over 20% (195,545) being for out-of-service conditions.

>>> Review the 2019 International Truck Inspection Results <<<

Obeying safety standards and being prepared for inspection at any time of the year is a vital aspect of any driver’s protocol.

What are CVSA Standards for critical violations?

The basis for violations comes from the CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria.

There are eight different levels of inspection the CVSA follows. However, truck inspections in the 2019 Roadcheck were only subjected to the North American Standard (NAS) Level I, II and III Inspections.

Out-of-service orders and the number, type and severity of safety violations affect a motor carrier’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) score and its Safety Fitness Determination (SFD) rating.


DOT Audits

We can perform a mock audit for you

You can stay ahead of the FMCSA by ensuring your drivers are in compliance before sending them out on the road. We offer many services, but one specifically—DOT Mock Audits—help trucking companies operate with the confidence that they will pass any audits or inspections the FMCSA throws at them.

Basically, in a DOT Mock Audit, we send out a specialist that will conduct an audit in the exact same way a DOT officer would. This can help keep you prepared for any surprise roadside inspection or any future actual DOT audits, and you can be sure that they will happen.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road and pass all DOT inspections.

For any assistance related to DOT Audits, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA approves drag link welds on Dodge Ram recall


The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) recently approved a new inspection bulletin in relation to a recall on the drag link assembly for 2013-2018 Dodge Ram 2500s and Dodge Ram 3500s.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) issued a safety recall report regarding the drag link assembly on 2013-2018 Dodge Ram 2500/3500s.

The CVSA has put the 2019-02 Inspection Bulletin in place to guide the inspection of the drag link assembly on those particular Ram 2500 and 3500 trucks that are subject to roadside inspections.

In accordance with the manufacturer’s approved recall remedy, these vehicles may have the outboard steering linkage jam nuts welded to the adjuster sleeve, which should not be cited as an out-of-service condition.

Drag link assembly
Drag link assembly weld locations for Dodge Ram recall

For the latest Inspection Bulletins, certified roadside inspectors should visit the CVSA’s Inspection Bulletins section to ensure inspections are conducted accurately and using the most up-to-date information.

Stay DOT compliant

It is important to stay up to date on vehicle maintenance, what is checked during an inspection and what can cause you to pass or fail an inspection.

We offer audit services and safety management programs that will ensure you stay in compliance at all times. All of our services are focused on keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.