Surprise CVSA HAZMAT Road Blitz Found 14% Violations in June 2021

Motor carriers whose drivers transport hazardous materials/dangerous goods are specially trained in emergency safety and applicable HM/DG federal regulations.

During the surprise five-day CVSA 2021 HM/DG Road Blitz in June, inspectors spotlight safety-compliant drivers, shippers and motor carriers with vehicles containing hazardous materials/dangerous goods to ensure everything is appropriately marked, placarded, packaged, and secured while being transported on our roadways.

Any vehicles found to have HM/DG out-of-service (OOS) violations, or any other driver/vehicle OOS violations, were restricted from traveling until all OOS violations were addressed.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OTHER CVSA INSPECTIONS

How many CMVs were stopped, inspected, and cited violations?

In the U.S. and Canada, 10,905 commercial motor vehicles and 8,363 HM/DG packages were inspected over that five-day period. Inspectors identified 2,714 violations, which included:

  • 496 shipping papers violations
  • 628 non-bulk/small means of containment packaging violations
  • 390 bulk packaging/large means of containment placarding violations
  • 277 non-bulk/small means of containment labeling violations
  • 307 bulk/large means of containment placarding violations
  • 167 other safety marks violations
  • 288 loading and securement violations
  • 50 HM/DG package integrity (leaking) violations

Below is a summary of the HM/DG class types inspected.

Class DescriptionCanadaMexicoU.S.Total
Class 1Explosives, such as ammunition, fireworks, flares, etc.11590317522
Class 2Flammable, non-flammable/non-poisonous and poisonous.2863671,5642,217
Class 3Flammable liquids, such as acetone, adhesives, paints, gasoline, ethanol, methanol, some pesticides, etc.4841, 5263,1405,150
Class 4Flammable solids, substances liable to spontaneously combust and substances that, on contact with water, emit flammable gases, such as white phosphorus and sodium.10217133252
Class 5Oxidizing agents and organic peroxides, such as hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium nitrite, ammonium nitrate fertilizers and oxygen generators.11026203339
Class 6Toxic and infectious substances; any material, other than a gas, that is so toxic to humans that it presents a health hazard during transportation, such as cyanide, biological samples, clinical wastes and some pesticides.11339120272
Class 7Radioactive materials, such as cobalt and cesium.96240138
Class 8Liquid or solid corrosive substances, such as sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide, that cause full thickness destruction of human skin at the site of contact within a specified time.1921601,1491,501
Class 9Miscellaneous HM/DG, such as acetaldehyde ammonia, asbestos, elevated temperature materials and benzaldehyde.114146430690

The CVSA HM/DG Road Blitz helps increase awareness of the hazardous materials/dangerous goods rules and regulations in place to keep the driver, the public and the environment safe.

Hazmat and DOT Training

At CNS, we are fully capable to handle your HAZMAT compliance training or other DOT training.

There are many rules, regulations, and requirements in each state for authorities to keep track of when it comes to hauling hazardous material. If you are not DOT compliant, it could be detrimental to your company, as fines and penalties can be upwards of $180,000.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

PA Weight Class Stickers Requirement Expected to be Removed this Fall


PA Weight Class Stickers

As the last state in the country with this requirement, the Pennsylvania Motor Truck Association (PMTA) has urged repeal for all trucks weight class 2 and above to display the registration weight class sticker on the windshield.

Currently, under Chapter 55 of the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s (PennDOT) regulations, trucks, truck tractors or combinations registered to operate at weights greater than 5,000 pounds are required to display a registration class sticker and replace a registration class sticker when stolen, damaged or destroyed.

This regulation will rescind Chapter 55 since PennDOT, interested third parties and law enforcement no longer need to determine the registered weight of trucks, truck tractors or combinations. Instead, third parties rely on the registration card to determine the authorized operating weight of trucks, truck tractors or combinations.

Therefore, the use of a registration class sticker is no longer needed, and its elimination will result in administrative and cost savings to the Department and the regulated community.

The registration class stickers cost the Department an average of $25,000 annually to maintain the needed inventory, which can be saved because of this rulemaking. The long-term administrative savings to the Commonwealth and its taxpayers will have positive financial, economic, and social impacts on the public.

LEARN MORE ABOUT LICENSING AND PERMITTING REQUIREMENTS

Rescinding this chapter to eliminate the requirement to apply for arid affix registration class stickers will positively impact an estimated 1.6 million Commercial and non-commercial trucks, truck tractors or combinations, including businesses small and large, that are currently required to display a registration class sticker.

The use of a registration class sticker is not mandated by state or federal law. These amendments will not affect other Department regulations or the regulations of any other Commonwealth agency.

It is expected that PennDOT will publish the final regulation this fall after the legislature returns after the Pennsylvania Senate reconvenes September 20th and the House on September 27th.

Why choose Compliance Navigation Specialists for your licensing and permitting needs?

Compliance Navigation Specialists has been licensing and permitting trucking companies for over 30 years, that’s how we got started! 

Our team knows the nuances of licensing and permitting. No matter what state you are in, your size (from one vehicle to a thousand vehicles), nor the complexity of your operation, we here at CNS can handle it.

If you’re just getting started we can help obtain all the relative information you need to be compliant and legal. If you are an established company, we can help add new or delete vehicles from your account, track and renew your vehicle registrations, title management, and more.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Lab Delays Increase with Quarterly Testing Spike, Shipping Delays, and CCF Errors

Lab Delays Increase with Quarterly Testing Spike, Shipping Delays, and CCF Errors

Many businesses requiring pre-employment or random drug testing are seeing delays in drug tests across the country.

We understand the frustration to get these employees working as quickly as possible. As we continually reach out to labs to check the status of the specimens for our client’s, below are what we are seeing causing the delays.

Shipping delays in drug screen specimens arriving at the lab

These shipping delays are due to heavy package volume caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, COVID-19 business closures, staffing shortages, weather, and other service disruptions.

There is also an especially large volume of specimens at end of each quarter as companies and consortiums need to meet the minimum DOT testing percentage requirements.

At least 50% of DOT governed employees in a testing pool must be randomly tested for drugs while 10% must be tested for alcohol by the end of the testing year. These minimum testing requirements are managed on a quarterly basis.

If these numbers are not met for any pool, every company that has drivers in that pool is out of compliance with the DOT.

Other shipping delays may occur due to the timing of the courier pickup. For example, a specimen collected at 4:50pm might miss the collection site’s courier pickup and would not get to the lab for an extra day. A specimen collected at 8:30am will ship at the same time as every other specimen collected that day (often around 3-5 pm). Also, a specimen collected on a Friday, might not be tested at the lab until Monday.  

These delays are affecting the entire US, not just isolated areas. However, in some isolated cases, specimens are taking up to 7 days to arrive at the lab. 

Lab turnaround delays

With lab turnarounds being an issue, it is important to note that labs are experiencing the same staffing shortages as other businesses. 

In July, i3screen reported that there are turnaround delays on test results due to staffing shortages at several laboratories, affecting both Quest and LabCorp.

Laboratories receive thousands of specimens each night from couriers and lab technicians, review all chain of custody forms to make sure each chain does not have missing information, and perform a Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) test on samples with trace amounts of drugs during the initial screen.

If there is any trace of drugs in that initial screen’s sample, it goes through a GCMS test once or multiple times (after breaking down the urine sample further) until the test produces an affirmative negative, positive, negative-dilute, or positive-dilute result.

Since a batch of drug test samples gets processed once every 24 hours during the GCMS testing, the staffing shortage is likely to backlog these processes further.

For our clients, as soon as a result is reported to the MRO team, we will get the results out as soon as possible. CNS is not experiencing any delays within the MRO department and results that come in from the lab that can be released to the client are sent out within 2 hours. 

Collection site error delays

Errors made by the employer or collection site may require affidavits to be completed and sent back to the lab for the technicians to verify again before they will even run the test.

With staffing shortages affecting the largest drug screening labs across the country, the delays in turnaround will be most visible with these chain of custody form flaws.

An example of a correctable flaw is when the lab receives an old CCF, missing signatures, etc.

In addition, certain affidavits/items are legally required by the MRO team before results can be released such as: DOT upgrades and downgrades, MRO copies of the CCFs, missing temperatures, etc.

These types of errors cause significant delays. 

Drug and Alcohol Services

CNS offers a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Service and are a certified consortium and third-party administrator (C/TPA).

Our experts ensure that all DOT rules and regulations are followed, including the implementation of random drug tests for you and your drivers, updating your company drug testing policies, record retention and document purge management.

We take all the necessary steps and precautions to keep you and your drivers compliant with the DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Staffing Shortages at Labs Causing Turnaround Delays for Drug Screens

i3screen is reporting that there are turnaround delays on drug test results due to staffing shortages at several laboratories, affecting both Quest and LabCorp.

As the nursing shortage hits the healthcare system, escalating due to COVID burnout, the laboratory community is facing not enough medical technologists to properly staff the nation’s laboratories.

i3screen is reporting that there are turnaround delays on drug test results due to staffing shortages at several laboratories, affecting both Quest and LabCorp.

Laboratories receive thousands of specimens each night from couriers and lab technicians, review all chain of custody forms to make sure each chain does not have missing information, and perform a Gas Chromatography – Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) test on samples with trace amounts of drugs during the initial screen.

With staffing shortages affecting the largest drug screening labs across the country, the delays in turnaround will be most visible if there are chain of custody form flaws or drugs potentially found in the specimen.

This is because when it is determined that a chain has a correctable flaw, the lab sends a memorandum of record (or affidavit) to the collector to be completed and sent back to the lab for the technicians to verify again.

An example of a correctable flaw is when the lab receives an old CCF and requests an affidavit to be fixed. The lab cannot proceed with testing the sample until they receive the completed memorandum, which delays the overall resulting times.

If there is any trace of drugs in that initial screen’s sample, it goes through a GCMS test once or multiple times (after breaking down the urine sample further) until the test produces an affirmative negative, positive, negative-dilute, or positive-dilute result.

Since a batch of drug test samples gets processed once every 24 hours during the GCMS testing, the staffing shortage is likely to backlog these processes further.

For our clients, as soon as a result is reported to the MRO team, we will get the results out as soon as possible.

Drug and Alcohol Services

At CNS, we offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Service and are a certified consortium and third-party administrator (C/TPA).

Our experts ensure that all DOT rules and regulations are followed, including the implementation of random drug tests for you and your drivers, updating your company drug testing policies, record retention and document purge management.

We take all the necessary steps and precautions to keep you and your drivers compliant with the DOT drug and alcohol testing requirements.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

The Benefits To Fleets Being Proactive in DOT Safety Compliance

All fleets should be proactive, not reactive, when it comes to DOT compliance and safety management

Fleets that say they care about putting “safety first” but still struggle with safety issues often have passive safety strategies.

These strategies do not provide enough fleet safety data to know what is going or the data is collected after something happened.

As a carrier governed by FMCSA regulations, it is not good practice to wait until you get audited by the FMCSA, but rather to be ready at all times.

For this reason, passive safety programs are inadequate and can lead to increased fines and fleet risk, especially when it comes with DOT compliance and driver management.

According to FMCSA closed enforcement cases for the last five years, carriers’ average costs of non-compliance was settled for $7,000 per carrier! On top of this, it can cost a carrier an additional $870 of downtime when a driver was placed out-of-service for 10 hours.

Ensuring drivers are following FMCSA regulations and company policies can be overwhelming when trying to manage commercial driver licenses (CDLs), endorsements, physicals, daily vehicle inspection reports (DVIRs) and training certificates manually.

This is where being proactive is key.

Proactive safety management means you and your company are working hard to be safe, compliant and stay ahead of the FMCSA.

 

Reasons to invest in a third-party proactive DOT compliance program

Regardless of what you haul or what industry your fleet is in, being proactive in safety management is crucial in keeping compliance fines and driver management costs low.

Your fleet should consider a third-party compliance partner if your company:

  • Is growing and you are trying to save money
  • Is trying to stay compliant with the FMCSA
  • Has grown and you need a Safety Director or a Safety Department, or
  • Wants to lower your CSA scores

Carriers being proactive will put them in a better position to mitigate risk, improve efficiencies, reduce costs, and spend more time with their drivers in an effort to manage a safe and compliant fleet. 

With proactive safety, carriers will be more organized and will have a measured plan to lower motor carrier Safety Measurement System (SMS) scores.

When partnering with a third-party program, your fleet has a team of experts that costs much less than hiring a safety director or team and can receive constant monitoring to keep your operation FMCSA compliant. Driver management will be simplified and the driver hiring process will shorten.

While data and paper management can be crucial, using a third-party partner will help you be prepared for audit representation, provide document storage, and offer up-to-date company policies and handbook of FMCSA rules and regulation changes.

Not only will proactive safety help your fleet with DOT compliance, but it is proven to lower insurance premiums as you will have documented ways to show a reduction in risk.

 

Are you ready to be proactive?

Our safety management programs are perfect for combining multiple services and can be tailored to fit your needs, whether you are a new owner operator or a seasoned trucker or business owner.

At CNS, our DOT Compliance Programs focus on Proactive Safety Management (PSM), a mindset that will ensure your fleet’s safety and compliance is always in order and ahead of the FMCSA.

Our PSM Motor Carrier Program includes:

  • ELD management
  • Driver Qualification File Management
  • New driver on-boarding
  • Driver safety meetings
  • CSA score management
  • Policies and handbooks
  • Vehicle maintenance
  • and more

Learn more about our DOT Compliance Programs

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.


Truck driver challenges during Coronavirus pandemic


COVID-19 and challenges for truckers

Truck drivers face concerns whether coming or going in this fight against the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Personal and economic challenges face the 1.8 million CMV drivers in America, because unlike other businesses, a driver cannot simply choose to work from home.

How the Pandemic is Affecting Limo, Bus and Touring Companies

Drivers face personal risk during this outbreak

At the forefront, the personal health and wellness of truck drivers is at stake. Drivers are literally in the front seat of this crisis as they travel the country delivering goods.

Several factors put truck drivers at greater risk of being exposed and/or contracting the coronavirus, including:

  • nationwide travel
  • handling of overseas goods
  • exposure at truck stops for meals and showers
  • multiple facility stops

On the flip side, driving is mostly an isolated activity. Still, it’s difficult for a driver to practice the social distancing recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Drivers face greater risk of illness

Besides the greater risk of contact with the coronavirus, according to a 2014 study by the CDC, drivers may also be at greater risk of falling ill from the virus .

The study showed more than half of truck drivers smoke and are two times as likely to have diabetes as the rest of the population. These health factors put them in a higher risk category should they contract the COVID-19 virus strain.

The issue grows greater with the realization that 38% of drivers do not have health insurance (same CDC study). Furthermore, paid sick leave in the trucking industry is uncommon.

Many companies are now conducting pre-shift screenings and temperature checks to further protect their employees.

Drivers face economic uncertainty

Additionally, financial stability for drivers is threatened by the secondary fallout of the virus, economic downturn. Since between 350,000 and 400,000 of America’s drivers are independent owner-operators, they work freelance, without the benefits of regulations that protect workers from sudden wage loss.

For fleet drivers, however, the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN) protects workers by requiring companies with more than one hundred employees to give at least 60-days of notice before layoffs or closings, if it would affect 50 or more employees.

Still, companies can increase down days or slow line rates as needed when addressing a market downturn.

Waiting out the viral impact

It seems likely the coronavirus outbreak will amplify pricing and capacity swings in the US trucking industry in 2020. Logistics experts warn of a coming price shock for shippers. Downshifts in the trucking market capacity and shipping rates are expected to remain longer than normal. However, when freight volume rises, as is expected when quarantines lift, so will rates. 

>>> How are trucking companies preparing for the Coronavirus? <<<

Factors that increase shipping rates include the following:

  • short supply of trucks
  • increase in freight demand
  • produce season
  • spring retail sales surge
  • manufacturing increases

Each of these factors could result in greater truckload capacity, which would ease the pinch of the coronavirus impact to the trucking industry and drivers, specifically.


Trucking Startups, Hiring Drivers and CDL Training

No matter what your current situation is in the trucking industry, we have a service that would be valuable to you, like CDL trainingstarting your own trucking business or hiring new, qualified drivers.

If you have been laid off, this might be a good time to start training to get your CDL. There will be a need for more drivers as businesses and events resume normal operation in the coming months.

If you are already a driver in the trucking industry, this may be the perfect time for you to start your own trucking company. Securing loads will not be an issue once the economy bounces back.

If you are a trucking company, you will most likely need to be hiring qualified drivers in the near future, and you will need to get good, qualified drivers very quickly, as well as manage all of the files for those drivers.

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

FMCSA waives CDL, medical certification renewal regs


Waived through June 30

Due to the effects of COVID-19, the US Department of Transportation will not enforce certain licensing and medical certification renewal regulations for drivers whose credentials expired on or after March 1, 2020.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration issued a waiver Tuesday extending commercial driver’s license and commercial learner’s permit validity until June 30 for those that expire on or after March 1. CLP holders will not be required to retake the general and endorsement knowledge tests if utilizing the waiver.

The notice also waives the requirement for drivers to have a medical exam or certification, as long as the drivers have proof of a valid medical certification that was issued for at least 90 days and expired on or after March 1.

The waiver follows President Trump’s national emergency declaration on March 13 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. FMCSA says a number of states have more employee absences than normal or closed offices, making it difficult for commercial drivers to renew their licenses. Additionally, FMCSA notes many medical service providers have canceled regularly scheduled appointments, not allowing drivers to get appointments for DOT physicals with medical examiners.

In addition to the above waivers, the notice also:

  • Waives the requirement that CLP holders wait 14 days to take the CDL skills test.
  • Waives the requirement that truckers provide states with a medical examiner’s certificate, as long as they have proof of a valid med cert that expired on or after March 1.
  • Waives the requirement that states change drivers’ med cert status to “not certified” upon the expiration of the certificate if it expires after March 1.
  • Allows FMCSA to continue to recognize the validity of Canadian and Mexican commercial licenses when those jurisdictions issue similar notices extending license validity

For more information, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR)—What is it and why it’s important

Gross Combination Weight Rating

GCWR vs. GVWR

“Know before you tow,” is an easy way to remind drivers and fleet managers to check their vehicles Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR) before putting drivers and vehicles on the road.

At times it can be difficult to determine the GCWR and you may need to take into account the GVWR as well.

What is the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR)?

The Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) is determined by the manufacturer and takes into account the base curb weight of the vehicle plus the weight of any optional accessories, cargo and passengers.

You should never load a vehicle beyond the listed gross vehicle weight rating.

What is the Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR)?

The Gross Combination Weight Rating (GCWR) is the maximum safe weight of both:

  • the loaded tow vehicle, and
  • the loaded trailer

But what is so important about the GCWR? Here we answer your questions.

Check out our industry library resources of 15 videos, 2 ebooks, industry links, and CNS In The News content.

Where can I find the maximum GCWR for my vehicle?

Manufacturers determine the maximum weight rating for each vehicle, and it can be found on your vehicle placard. However, if this information is not available, it is possible to calculate your own.

How can I calculate my vehicle’s Gross Combination Weight?

You can use the use the following formulas to calculate your vehicle’s GCWR:


GROSS VEHICLE WEIGHT (GVW):

Vehicle Base Curb Weight
(vehicle + full fuel tank + standard equipment, but NOT passengers)
+
Cargo Weight
(cargo + extra equipment + trailer tongue)
+
Passenger Weight

= GVW

LOADED TRAILER WEIGHT (LTW):

Weight of empty trailer
+
Weight of anything on or inside trailer

= LTW

GROSS COMBINATION WEIGHT (GCW)

GVW + LTW (above numbers) = GCW


How do I find the actual weights of these separate items?

A local public scale is needed to weigh either the separate items or weigh a fully loaded vehicle and trailer.

What are the problems with exceeding the GCWR?

  • You may damage your vehicle or your trailer by exceeding the weight limits.
  • You put your safety and the safety of others at risk.
  • You risk being unable to control your loaded vehicle. Slowing and stopping becomes difficult or impossible.

What kind of brakes do I need to manage my vehicle and trailer load?

It’s important to note that vehicle brakes are only rated for the Gross Vehicle Weight, NOT the combined weight.

If the Gross Combined Weight surpasses the Gross Vehicle Weight, you should use separate trailer brakes.

Determine what class of CDL you are required to have based on your GCW

Why is it important to know the GCW?

Single-unit vehicles, by themselves, may not qualify as a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV). However, the addition of a trailer—or any weight—may put the vehicle over the threshold, causing it to be considered a CMV.

With the additional weight, this vehicle combination may now require the driver to have a Commercial Driver’s License (CDL), therefore, it is important to know the Gross Combined Weight to ensure that the driver has the proper license.

Knowing your vehicle’s Gross Combined Weight Rating is more than just a policy, it’s also a way to ensure safety is upheld for all drivers on the road.

If you have questions, call or email CNS at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

DOT Random Drug Testing Percentage Rate Increase (2020)

DOT Random Drug Testing

50% increase for DOT random drug testing

Each year, the FMCSA evaluates the rate of positive testing results for controlled substances. Depending on the reported figures, they modify their testing percentage rates.

For 2020, according to the FMCSA’s notice of program change, the testing percentage rate for controlled substances has increased to 50% of the average number of driver positions.

This new testing rate increase affects drivers of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) requiring a commercial driver’s license (CDL).

Final rule regarding DOT random drug testing rates

When the number of positive tests for controlled substances in a calendar year increase to equal or greater than 1%, the FMCSA must also increase the minimum annual random testing percentage rate.

The rates increase on January 1 of the following calendar year. This accounts for a delay in application of this final rule to a full year after results are reported.

The results of the 2018 FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Testing Survey showed a 1% increase in the rate of positive tests for controlled substances. As a result, the percentage rate for DOT random drug testing increased from 25% to 50 % of the average number of driver positions. This increase went into effect on January 1, 2020.

The testing rates for alcohol will remain the same, which is 10% of the average number of driver positions.

Increased testing rates equals increased industry cost

It is estimated that the cost of additional testing will add between $50 to $70 million more to industry costs.

With the new 2020 testing rate, approximately 2.1 million random controlled substances tests will be conducted, doubling from the previous years’ 1.05 million tests.


Drug and Alcohol Services

We offer a number of services related to drug and alcohol requirements

If you have questions or need help with your drug and alcohol program, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

2nd Annual Compliance Conference (Recap)


On January 31, 2020, Compliance Navigation Specialists hosted our 2nd Annual CNS Compliance Conference held at the Eden Resort in Lancaster, PA. Overall the event was a success and had an excellent turnout, bringing in over 215 attendees from across Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey and Virginia.

John Irwin—CEO of Compliance Navigation Specialists—kicked off the event addressing the state of compliance for 2020 and also later discussed the tiered weather system to be implemented this year and also discussed CVSA road checks and the top violation among carriers across the country, which for 2019 was hiring unqualified drivers.

We also had Shane Phillips—Compliance and Enforcement Specialist with the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture—who discussed 2020 Spotted Lanternfly Permitting, the Department of Agriculture’s Spotted Lanternfly program, updates and/or changes to that program and what counties are currently under quarantine for the Spotted Lanternfly.

Our keynote speaker for the conference was David Yessen—FMCSA’s Director of Compliance. Mr. Yessen primarily covered the FMCSA Clearinghouse, who needs to sign up, how and who it effects. The clearinghouse effects CDL drivers for carriers across North America. Mr. Yessen engaged many attendees at the conference regarding their experiences with getting registered in the clearinghouse.

Watch Mr. Yessen’s speech now (Speech starts at :52 minutes)

Following Mr. Yessen was Denny Beecher—Commercial Auto Underwriter at Interstate Insurance Management Inc.—covering the many factors that effect insurance premiums and underwriting in the commercial trucking industry. Mr. Beecher mentioned some of the most common triggers in various states for increasing your premiums, including driver history, experience level and crash rates.

Watch Mr. Beecher’s speech now (Speech starts: 1 hour and 52 minutes).

Next, we heard from several PA State Troopers and Motor Carrier Enforcement officers who spoke specifically about different approaches the state was taking to mitigate accidents, which is their top priority. They listed out the top counties that had the highest accident frequencies and roadside violations. They also discussed information regarding DataQ’s or challenging violations that appear on a carrier’s Safety Management System (SMS) and how to go about challenging those violations. Learn more about the DataQ process.

Watch PA State Trooper’s speech now (Speech starts at beginning of video 2).

The conference concluded with a Q&A session incorporating all speakers, giving attendees the opportunity to ask any specific questions that were gathered throughout the conference.

Anyone interested in watching the conference can like our CNS Facebook page to watch all or portions of the conference.

Photos
Enjoy some photos from the 2nd Annual Compliance Conference

Video
2nd Annual Compliance Conference – Part 1
2nd Annual Compliance Conference – Part 2