Video Blog: Safety Rating Upgrade Frequently Asked Questions

Compliance Review, Conditional, Unsatisfactory, Notice of Claim

Frequently asked questions about the safety rating upgrade process at CNS! Chris, our VP of Business Development, interviews Hoyt Craver, our Safety Rating Upgrade Project Coordinator. We achieve incredible success with the FMCSA, learn more in this short clip.

 

2018 Brake Safety Week Results

Nearly 5,000 Commercial Motor Vehicles with Critical Brake Violations Removed from Roadways During Brake Safety Week

Greenbelt, Maryland (Nov. 6, 2018) – During Brake Safety Week, Sept. 16-22, 2018, enforcement personnel in 57 jurisdictions throughout Canada and the United States conducted 35,080 inspections on commercial motor vehicles and captured and reported data on brake violations. The majority of vehicles inspected did not have any brake-related out-of-service conditions; however, inspectors found critical vehicle inspection items in the brake systems of 4,955 (14.1 percent) of the vehicles inspected and placed those vehicles out of service until the condition(s) could be corrected.

Brake violations were the top vehicle out-of-service violation during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck 72-hour enforcement initiative in June 2018. And according to the U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) data (snapshot as of Sept. 28, 2018), out of 2.38 million inspections, there were 1,045,335 brake-related violations in federal fiscal 2018, with a portion of those accounting for seven of the top 20 vehicle violations. In an effort to address brake system violations, jurisdictions throughout North America participated in this year’s Brake Safety Week.

The goal of this week-long brake safety enforcement and outreach initiative is to reduce the number of crashes involving brake-related problems by raising awareness throughout the motor carrier community of the importance of properly functioning brake systems and by conducting roadside inspections to identify and remove vehicles with critical brake violations from our roadways.

Brake Safety Week data also captured antilock braking systems (ABS) violations, indicating how well ABS are maintained in accordance with federal regulations. ABS help the vehicle to stop in the shortest possible distance under many conditions and to maintain steering control in situations when tires may slip. Many participating jurisdictions surveyed ABS compliance. ABS violations were counted when the malfunction lamp did not illuminate or stayed on, indicating an issue of some kind. The findings are as follows:

  • 26,143 air-braked power units required ABS; 8.3 percent (2,176) had ABS violations.
  • 17,857 trailers required ABS; 12.5 percent (2,224) had ABS violations.
  • 5,354 hydraulic-braked trucks required ABS; 4.4 percent (234) had ABS violations.
  • 651 motorcoaches/buses required ABS; 2 percent (13) had ABS violations.

Brake Safety Week deployed several strategies to help make our roadways safer:

  • Prevention – Since the dates of Brake Safety Week are announced well in advance, it gives motor carriers and drivers ample opportunity to ensure their vehicles are proactively checked and properly maintained and any issues found are corrected. Everyone wants the vehicles that are inspected to pass inspection. A vehicle that passes inspection increases overall safety.
  • Education – Brake Safety Week is an opportunity for law enforcement personnel to educate drivers and motor carriers on the inspection procedure with a focus on the vehicle’s mechanical components, especially the brake systems. Education and awareness are key in prompting preventative action to ensure each commercial motor vehicle is safe and roadworthy.
  • Action – Inspectors who identified commercial motor vehicles with critical brake issues during the inspection process were able to remove those dangerous vehicles from our roadways. If a vehicle has brake-related critical inspection items, it’s law enforcement’s duty and responsibility to place that vehicle out of service, safeguarding the public.

“Whether you’re driving a commercial motor vehicle or inspecting one, we all know the importance of properly functioning brakes,” said CVSA President Lt. Scott Carnegie with the Mississippi Highway Patrol. “It is essential that we – law enforcement, drivers and motor carriers – do all that we can through prevention, education, outreach and action to ensure only the safest commercial motor vehicles are being operated by professional drivers on our roadways.”

Brake Safety Week is part of CVSA’s Operation Airbrake Program in partnership with FMCSA and the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators.

IRP Update: Kentucky Updated Fee Schedule

Kentucky Updated Fee Schedule, Commonwealth of Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, IRP Changes

The Commonwealth of Kentucky Transportation Cabinet has released a memo stating that Kentucky ad valorem fee conversion factor will change effective January 1, 2019.

Conversion Factor Table and Fee Calculation Example

 

KY Fee Table

Example Fee Calculation:

Ad Valorem Fee – Purchase Price ($100,000.00) X Year of Purchase Factor (.00608) = $608.00 X Kentucky Mileage Percentage (.50) = $304.00

Weight Fee – 80,000 Pound Weight Fee ($1,410.00) X Kentucky Mileage Percentage (.50) = $705.00

Total Fee – $304.00+ $705.00 = $1009.00

Note: The ad valorem fee is not applicable to any current year purchase and is not prorated.

IRP Update: Utah Decal

IRP Update: Utah Decal

Utah State Tax Commission has announced Effective January 1, 2019 Utah DMV Motor Carrier Services will no longer issue month or year decals for apportioned license plates. Utah Code 41-1a-301 (6)(d)(iii)(B) reads,
“A registrant of an apportioned vehicle is not required to display month or year decals.” Owners are still required to maintain current registration for all apportioned vehicles, and present cab cards to law enforcement when requested.

For questions please contact Motor Carrier Services 801-297-6800.

Progressive Smart Haul Program | Northern Insurance Specialists

Progressive Smart Haul Program

Northern Insurance Specialists (NIS) is proud to offer Progressive Smart Haul® Program. The Smart Haul® program is a usage-based insurance program. The Smart Haul® program will save drivers a minimum of 3 percent on their initial Progressive 12-month policy that has primary liability coverage. Progressive will assess the data at each renewal to determine the savings.

‘At NIS we are always looking for ways to help our commercial truck and auto customers save money. Now NIS and Progressive Commercial have teamed up to bring truckers a powerful new way to save money on their commercial truck insurance. Whether you’re a new venture or seasoned owner operator, the Progressive Smart Haul Program is fast, easy and can save you substantial dollars on your commercial truck insurance’ says Ron Haws Agency Director of Northern Insurance Specialists.

If eligible, you can choose to participate in Smart Haul® when getting your quote. If you do you’ll get an instant 3% savings just for granting access to your driving data. Then Progressive will work with your ELD vendor to see if you’re eligible for additional savings up to a total of 18%. The amount is determined by reviewing your recent driving data, which can include information about your vehicle, driving behavior, location and other diagnostics. Your savings depends on how safe your driving is compared to truckers who do similar work. As long as you stay a Progressive customer and choose to participate in the program, Progressive will automatically adjust your premium at each renewal to reflect your most recent driving data.

Smart Haul is available in most states. To qualify you must have an ELD, a USDOT number and Primary Liability coverage on you Progressive for-hire truck policy.

Progressive is the #1 truck insurer and NIS is a top agency performer for Progressive Truck Insurance. Northern Insurance Specialists LLC currently writes commercial auto insurance in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Oklahoma, Texas.

Talk to a Trucking Insurance Specialists

Northern Insurance Specialists can help further explain the process as well as communicate the savings you will receive. Give one of our specialists a call to get the process started and to experience how quick you can see the savings apply to your Premium. The savings will only get better over time, so why not START now!
Learn More

 

FMCSA Issues Personal Conveyance Guidance

FMCSA states personal conveyance is the movement of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for personal use while off-duty. A driver may record time operating a CMV for personal conveyance as off-duty only when the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work by the motor carrier. The CMV may be used for personal conveyance even if it is laden, since the load is not being transported for the commercial benefit of the motor carrier at that time. Personal conveyance does not reduce a driver’s or motor carrier’s responsibility to operate a CMV safely. Motor carriers can establish personal conveyance limitations either within the scope of, or more restrictive than, the guidance provided here.

Click here for a recorded presentation that provides an overview of the revised personal conveyance guidance; the corresponding powerpoint slides are available here.

FMCSA updates the guidance for § 395.8 Driver’s Record of Duty Status to read as follows:

Question 26: Under what circumstances may a driver operate a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) as a personal conveyance?

Guidance: A driver may record time operating a CMV for personal conveyance (i.e., for personal use or reasons) as off-duty only when the driver is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work by the motor carrier. The CMV may be used for personal conveyance even if it is laden, since the load is not being transported for the commercial benefit of the carrier at that time. Personal conveyance does not reduce a driver’s or motor carrier’s responsibility to operate a CMV safely. Motor carriers can establish personal conveyance limitations either within the scope of, or more restrictive than, this guidance, such as banning use of a CMV for personal conveyance purposes, imposing a distance limitation on personal conveyance, or prohibiting personal conveyance while the CMV is laden.

Examples of Appropriate Uses of a CMV While Off-duty for Personal Conveyance

The following are examples of appropriate uses of a CMV while off-duty for personal conveyance include, but are not limited to:

  1. Time spent traveling from a driver’s en route lodging (such as a motel or truck stop) to restaurants and entertainment facilities.
  2. Commuting between the driver’s terminal and his or her residence, between trailer-drop lots and the driver’s residence, and between work sites and his or her residence. In these scenarios, the commuting distance combined with the release from work and start to work times must allow the driver enough time to obtain the required restorative rest as to ensure the driver is not fatigued.
  3. Time spent traveling to a nearby, reasonable, safe location to obtain required rest after loading or unloading. The time driving under personal conveyance must allow the driver adequate time to obtain the required rest in accordance with minimum off-duty periods under 49 CFR 395.3(a)(1) (property-carrying vehicles) or 395.5(a) (passenger-carrying vehicles) before returning to on-duty driving, and the resting location must be the first such location reasonably available.
  4. Moving a CMV at the request of a safety official during the driver’s off-duty time
  5. Time spent traveling in a motorcoach without passengers to en route lodging (such as motel or truck stop), or to restaurants and entertainment facilities and back to the lodging. In this scenario, the driver of the motorcoach can claim personal conveyance provided the driver is off-duty. Other off-duty drivers may be on board the vehicle, and are not considered passengers.
  6. Time spent transporting personal property while off-duty.
  7. Authorized use of a CMV to travel home after working at an offsite location.

Examples of Uses of a CMV that Would Not Qualify as Personal Conveyance

The following are examples of uses of a CMV that would not qualify as personal conveyance include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. The movement of a CMV in order to enhance the operational readiness of a motor carrier. For example, bypassing available resting locations in order to get closer to the next loading or unloading point or other scheduled motor carrier destination.
  2. After delivering a towed unit, and the towing unit no longer meets the definition of a CMV, the driver returns to the point of origin under the direction of the motor carrier to pick up another towed unit.
  3. Continuation of a CMV trip in interstate commerce in order to fulfill a business purpose, including bobtailing or operating with an empty trailer in order to retrieve another load or repositioning a CMV (tractor or trailer) at the direction of the motor carrier.
  4. Time spent driving a passenger-carrying CMV while passenger(s) are on board. Off-duty drivers are not considered passengers when traveling to a common destination of their own choice within the scope of this guidance.
  5. Time spent transporting a CMV to a facility to have vehicle maintenance performed.
  6. After being placed out of service for exceeding the maximum periods permitted under part 395, time spent driving to a location to obtain required rest, unless so directed by an enforcement officer at the scene.
  7. Time spent traveling to a motor carrier’s terminal after loading or unloading from a shipper or a receiver.
  8. Time spent operating a motorcoach when luggage is stowed, the passengers have disembarked and the driver has been directed to deliver the luggage.

For questions regarding personal conveyance email: shane@cnsprotects.com

CVSA Releases 2018 Operation Safe Driver Week Results

On September 19th the CVSA released 2018 Safe Driver Week results. Operation Safe Driver week happen July 15-21,2018, to identify CMV drivers and passenger vehicle drivers engaged in unsafe driving behaviors. Officers issued 57,405 citations and 87,907 warnings to drivers throughout the week. This safe driving enforcement and awareness campaign aims to call attention to driver behaviors, the main cause of crashes, and combat those behaviors through heightened traffic safety enforcement and educational outreach.

CVSA said during Operation Safe Driver Week, a safety initiative of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA), 51,000 law enforcement officers made contact with 113,331 CMV drivers and passenger vehicle drivers and issued 57,405 citations. A total of 42,144 CMV contacts were made with 10,709 citations issued and 71,187 passenger vehicle contacts were made with 46,696 citations issued.

In addition to the citations that were issued to drivers throughout Operation Safe Driver Week, officers also issued a total of 87,907 warnings. CMV drivers were given 29,908 warnings; 57,999 warnings were given to passenger vehicle drivers.

The top five citations issued to CMV drivers were:

  1. State/Local Laws – 6,008 citations
  2. Speeding – 1,908 citations
  3. Failing to use a seat belt while operating a CMV – 1,169 citations
  4. Failure to obey a traffic control device – 754 citations
  5. Using a handheld phone – 262 citations

The top five citations issued to passenger vehicle drivers were:

  1. State/Local Laws – 21,511 citations
  2. Speeding – 16,909 citations
  3. Failing to use a seat belt – 3,103 citations
  4. Inattentive and/or careless driving – 1,655 citations
  5. Failure to obey a traffic control device – 739 citations

Operation Safe Driver Week results also of note:

  • A total of 1,822 drivers (1,699 passenger vehicle drivers and 123 CMV drivers) were cited for reckless, inattentive and/or careless driving.
  • 366 drivers were cited for possession/use/under the influence of alcohol or drugs or both. 42 of the citations were issued to CMV drivers; 324 were issued to passenger vehicle drivers.
  • Specific to CMV drivers, 17 were cited for operating their vehicle while ill or fatigued, and 14 received citations for using/equipping their CMV with a radar detector.

CVSA also said public awareness and educational campaigns are also a major aspect of this initiative. CVSA offers resources on its website for CMV drivers, teen and novice drivers, driver’s education instructors and driver trainers. During Operation Safe Driver Week, 177 safety programs were downloaded and delivered to teens and CMV drivers. The safety programs target unsafe driving behaviors and aim to prevent crashes through effective education.

In addition to enforcement and education, 8,533 motorists were assisted during Operation Safe Driver Week, highlighting the dedication to service and safety by law enforcement.

Meet Michael, our newest Account Manager!

Meet Michael, our newest Account Manager.

Mike enjoys spending time with his wife and son, lifting weights, hiking, reading, and video games.

Mike’s favorite food …. Pizza!

Favorite Vacation spot… Captiva Island (Florida)

He has a German Shepard named Phoenix and a Yellow Lab named Barkley.

His favorite movie(s)…. Lord of the Rings trilogy

His favorite TV show is ….. Seinfeld (a CNS favorite)

Stop in to say hello to Michael and if you are a Proactive Safety Management client you will be hearing from him soon enough!

Meet Hoyt, our new Project Coordinator

Meet Hoyt, our new Project Coordinator.

Hoyt’s favorite hobbies and pastimes include spending time with his wife Melanie, son Rhys and daughter Karys. He enjoys playing fantasy football, reading, working out and wrestling(especially Penn State’s team)

Favorite Food…. is 5 Guys – Burgers and Fries, as well as Pizza!

His Favorite Vacation spot…… is going to the NCAA wrestling championships each year..

Hoyt has one cat named Max and a turtle named Flash.

Favorite Movies…. To name a few among many favorites… Mad Max- Fury Road, The Big Lebowski, and Requiem for a Dream.

His Favorite TV show is….. Real Time with Bill Maher

If you do not survive a DOT Safety Audit- Compliance Review, you may be looking forward to meeting Hoyt sooner than you think!

Continue reading “Meet Hoyt, our new Project Coordinator”

New Agency Director at NIS

Northern Insurance Specialists (NIS) recently hired Ron Haws as the new Agency Director. With years of experience managing complex business operations in the hospitality industry, Haws believes he is uniquely suited to bring value and exceptional customer service to the commercial trucking industry.

One of his initial goals in his new role as Agency Director is to help truckers reduce operating expenses by enhancing compliance rates. Haws says, “The [trucking] industry is highly regulated and insurance is often one of the largest expenses a trucking company has to manage. Our role at NIS is to help truckers understand the importance of proper compliance with DOT regulations and the need to be vigilant and safe on the roads. Even the smallest DOT infractions can be very costly for truckers.”

As Agency Director, Haws will be responsible for helping both small and large commercial trucking companies meet their insurance needs. Haws added “I am excited to be part of such a strong team of professionals. NIS and our sister company Compliance Navigation Specialists, which specializes in safety and compliance management, are quickly working their way to the front when it comes to insurance and compliance for the trucking industry.”

With autonomous trucks on the horizon and increasing demand for transportation services due to a thriving economy, including demand from e-commerce, NIS is poised to become an industry leader in educating truckers on how to cut expenses through increasing their compliance to regulations. In a time of extreme industry flux, NIS is confident Haws will bring strong leadership to the business unit.