Final rule for hours of service goes to White House

HOS Final Rule to White House

HOS proposal goes to White House

In August of 2019 the FMCSA released a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) related to the hours of service rules and regulations and were also taking public comment on the DOT hours-of-service proposal.

As of Monday, March 2, 2020, the FMCSA has announced that they have filed the rule to the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB), which is one of the final steps before the rule is published in the Federal Register.

The rulemaking to reform the hours of service has maintained momentum, even with resignation of Ray Martinez in October of 2019. Martinez started the hours of service reform in the beginning of his term in 2018 and Jim Mullen said the FMCSA was still focused on seeing the rulemaking through.

The content of the final rule is not clear, as the text has not been made public, however it will still address the key issues that were covered in August 2019. You can review those proposed changes in our previous post.

>>> More driver flexibility after hours of service changes <<<

According to the Federal law, the rule must be approved or denied by the OMB within 90 days of its submission, however that deadline can be extended to 120 days.

When the OMB clears the rule, the FMCSA can publish the rule in the Federal Register. What does that mean? It means that the final rule could be filed in the coming months and once filed there will likely be an implementation period of months or years allowing the industry to prepare for the changes.


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these Hours-of-Service rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

ELD rule exemptions. Who is eligible?


Do you qualify for an ELD rule exemption?

The ELD mandate has been in full effect since December 16, 2019. But there are always exceptions, right?

Typically, the answer would be yes, but not with the ELD (Electronic Logging Device) compliance mandate. There are no exceptions to the new ELD rule, however there are some exemptions.

It is most important to understand that there are NO exceptions to the ELD rule, and AOBRD systems should be switched over to be ELD compliant at this point.

Read our previous blog post on the Required use of ELDs.

However, there are instances when a driver exemption is allowed. Here’s what you need to know about ELD exemptions.

Who is exempt from the ELD rule?

Driver exemptions

According to the FMCSA, exemptions apply to:

  • Drivers who use the timecard exception.
  • Drivers who use paper Records of Duty (RODs), no more than 8 days out of every 30-day period.
  • Drivers who are required to keep RODs, no more than 8 days within any 30-day period.
  • Drivers of vehicles manufactured before 2000 or before the model year 2000 (per the vehicle registration).
  • Drivers who conduct driveaway-towaway operations where the vehicle driven is the delivery, the vehicle transported is a motor home or a recreation vehicle trailer with one or more sets of wheels on the surface of the roadway.

Even though these drivers may not need to follow the ELD rule, they are still required to maintain accurate logs. This can be done on paper, with an AOBRD, or with a logging software program.

Who needs documentation supporting ELD rule exemptions?

Motor carriers will need documentation to support ELD rule exemptions. A carrier’s records may be inspected by authorized safety officials to determine if drivers meet the above exemption criteria.

Drivers do not have to carry documentation; however, motor carriers should maintain proper documentation at their place of business.

Vehicle exemptions

1. The vehicles engine age will determine its exemption status.

  • Vehicles manufactured prior to the year 2000 are exempt from the ELD rule.
  • Also, engines with plates or documentation predating model year 2000 are also exempt, even if the vehicle itself is newer. This sometimes happens when a vehicle is rebuilt with a “glider kit.”

2. Mobile homes and modular home transporters are not exempt.

  • Because the vehicle transporting the shipment is not part of the shipment itself, these drivers are not exempt.

3. Driving and/or living outside the United States is not an exemption.

  • If a driver lives outside the US, but drives inside the US, the driver and vehicle must comply with the US ELD rule.
  • If driving outside the US, work with your ELD provider to tailor the ELD system for accurate recording of driver hours. The ELD provider can help you comply with each country of operation.

Do you need an ELD provider? We can help.

Our Compliance Specialists can assist you with any questions.
Please call us at 888.260.9448 or email us at info@cnsprotects.com.

4. Even if your vehicle has an ELD, you may be exempt.

  • If a driver qualifies for an exemption, but their vehicle has an ELD installed, they may use their exemption and keep records a different way.
  • The motor carrier should configure the ELD to show the driver’s exemption. Or, they can use the ELD annotation feature to record the driver’s exemption.

5. Agricultural exemptions may be noted two ways

  • If motor carriers meet agricultural exemptions (395.1 (k)) or farm vehicle exemptions (395.1 (s)), their drivers can be noted as off-duty or “exempt.”

Be aware of exemption details and changes

As with any rule or regulation, there are many variables. Be aware of the details required to qualify for an exemption. We have summarized the exemptions here, and you can find the full ELD exemption language from the FMCSA for additional details and section references.


Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs)

At CNS we keep you updated on industry regulations and changes, like the ELD rule and others, so your motor carrier business can meet safety standards and remain compliant.

What ELD should you use?

We searched high and low for a partner in the ELD industry, testing over 20 ELD systems, before we decided to choose Pedigree as our preferred ELD.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Short-haul trucking and ELDs


The ELD mandate deadline is December 16, 2019 and approaching quickly and many short-haul trucking companies and drivers are taking that seriously, even though they may not have to.


As mentioned, even though some drivers may not necessarily need an ELD, some FMCSA hours of service rules still apply, including a time limit of no more than 11 hours and driving restrictions after 14 on duty hours.

Although short-haul drivers are not required to maintain a detailed log of their duty status, they are required to record their on-duty time and ELDs make that process much easier. With there always being a possibility of exceeding the FMCSA limitations, ELDs can protect you if you exceed the driving time limit or distance.

Short-haul drivers, fleet managers and/or company owners need to consider ELDs and the reasoning behind so many short-haul fleets installing ELDs.

First, you need to know if you are a short-haul driver, which is covered below. However, if you need a more detailed breakdown of short-haul exemptions, review our post on HOS short-haul exemptions.

Are you a short-haul driver?

The FMCSA rules and regulations state that you are a short-haul driver, if:

  • Start and return to the same location within twelve (12) hours of duty time.
  • Maintain your time-clock function.
  • Do not drive for more than eleven (11) hours.
  • Have ten (10) consecutive hours in off duty between shifts.
  • Operate within a 100 air-mile radius from your starting location (CDL driver)
  • Operate within a 150 air-mile radius (non-CDL drivers)
  • Does not drive through a state that requires a CDL for the vehicle they drive

Exceeding the short-haul limitation

A driver may violate the short-haul limitations by going over the radius limit or exceeding the time it takes to return to their reporting location.

If this happens, drivers are required to maintain a Record of Duty Status (RODS) for 8 days or less. After 8 days drivers must maintain a RODS according to the 8-day rule.

The 8-day rule is one of the biggest issues for any short-haul fleet because they are unable to determine if they will hit that 8-day limitation.

3 other reasons why short-haul trucking companies install ELDs

As mentioned above, remaining DOT compliant is the most important and biggest concern for short-haul trucking companies or any trucking company for that matter.

However, there are other reasons to install an ELD, including automatically calculating your air-miles, monitoring your driver’s driving habits and tracking driver’s idle-times.

1. Calculate 100 Air-Miles with ELDs

What is the 100 air-mile radius?

It can be difficult for drivers to calculate air-miles when they are on the road and an ELD eliminates this issue by automatically recording the distance covered.

This allows drivers to know when they will exceed 100 air-miles without calculating it, allowing them to stay completely focused on driving.

ELDs automatically record the distance covered and help drivers calculate how many air-miles they have driven.

2. Monitor driving habits and driver scorecards

Some ELDs, such as Pedigree ELDs—an electronic logging device solution we are partnered with—allows fleet managers to track and pinpoint drivers who have unsafe driving habits.

ELDs give you the ability to monitor reckless drivers by tracking driving behaviors, such as aggressive cornering, braking and acceleration.

Overall, the benefit is the improvement your company’s safety level and ultimately safety rating through less accidents, penalties, and liabilities.

3. Track driver idle-times

Many short-haul trucking fleets are interested in tracking a drivers’ idle-time due to the impact it can have on fuel savings throughout the year.

The US Department of Energy estimates that a long-haul truck idles for approximately 1,800 hours per year. With a fuel cost of $3/gallon, one truck could potentially consume over $5,000 in fuel each year by idling.

An ELD will allow fleet managers to locate drivers who idle too often or for longer periods of time, which could save short-haul trucking fleets thousands of dollars each month.


ELD solutions

We offer ELD devices for truckers to avoid all of the issues mentioned above. At CNS, we believe that taking a proactive stance on DOT compliance is the key to a successful long-haul or short-haul trucking company. Remember that the ELD mandate deadline is on December 16, 2019.

Also, knowing all Hours-of-Service rules and exceptions will allow you to stay DOT compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant and we partner with Pedigree Technologies for this exact reason.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Short-haul exemption: 100 air-mile radius


Are you 100 air-mile exempt?

What is an air mile?

An “air mile” is a nautical mile measuring a straight distance between two points, excluding any twists or turns.

What is the short-haul exemption?

If you are a short-haul driver or fleet, in addition to time restrictions, there are two types of short-haul exemptions related to distance, the 100 air-mile exemption and the 150 air-mile exemption.

  • 100 air-mile exemption

The exemption applies to CDL drivers and to qualify they must remain operating within a 100 air-mile radius, return to the same work reporting location, go off duty within 12 hours and keep time cards with their start times, end times and total hours worked for the day.

  • 150 air-mile exemption

This exemption is slightly different in that it applies to non-CDL drivers and instead of the operating radius being 100 air-miles, it is 150 air-miles. Similarly, drivers are required to keep timecards, return to the same work reporting location, and they do not drive through a state that requires a CDL for the vehicle they drive.

Exceeding the short-haul limitation

A driver may violate the short-haul limitations by going over the radius limit or exceeding the time it takes to return to their reporting location.

If this happens, drivers are required to maintain a Record of Duty Status (RODS) and more importantly, if they maintain a RODS for more than 8 days in a 30-day period, they must have an ELD because the mandate exemption does not apply after that 8 days.

The 8-day rule is one of the biggest issues for any short-haul fleet because they are unable to determine if they will hit that 8-day limitation. It is important to note that it is nearly impossible to implement an ELD on short notice, therefore, many questionable short-haul fleets are beginning to install ELDs.

Verifying compliance?

If you have drivers that exempt, it is imperative that you check time records to verify compliance with time and distance restrictions.

If a driver is in violation, you must also verify that they followed proper procedure by taking a 30-minute break and submitting their daily log.

If your company is audited and you or your drivers are found to be misusing these exemptions, you will be cited for each violation every day it occurred which can lead to a rather large fine.

ELDs and short-haul exemptions

In most cases, a driver that qualifies for the 100 or 150 air mile radius is exempt from the upcoming ELD mandate, but there are exceptions.

The final regulation says if you are running short haul, you are not required to maintain Record of Duty Status (RODS) and, therefore, do not need to log your hours with an ELD, unless you break the rule more than eight (8) times in a 30-day rolling period.

If you do break the rule more than eight times, you will need an ELD to log your hours until you get back to the number of eight or fewer in a 30-day period.

Although not always required, ELDs can be an excellent resource for a short-haul fleet. Constant awareness of a driver’s distance, eliminating any concerns of going beyond the radius limit, and monitoring driver scorecards are just two of many benefits.

Do you still need an ELD? We can help you out!


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe, compliant, and on the road.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

HOS short-haul exemptions and HOS compliance


What are short-haul exemptions?

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) developed several Hours-of-Service rules and regulations with a goal for these HOS rules to minimize driver fatigue and improve road safety for everyone.

However, the FMCSA has created certain exemptions giving drivers and carriers flexibility, depending on their situation. Different rules apply to passenger-carrying drivers, property-carrying drivers and drivers of hazardous materials.

Considering all of the potential HOS changes and so we are on the same page, we will discuss a few important Hours-of-Service rules, including the 14-hour rule, the 11-hour rule and the 30-minute break.

What are 3 important hours-of-service rules?

  • The 14-hour rule?

The 14-hour rule disallows a property-carrying driver from driving longer than 14 consecutive hours after starting duty. The driver cannot continue driving until they have taken ten (10) consecutive hours off-duty.

Passenger-carrying motor vehicles are limited to 15 cumulative hours. This differs from the 14 consecutive hours of property-carrying drivers.

For both property-carrying and passenger-carrying vehicles, off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

  • The 11-hour rule?

The 11-hour rule states that property-carrying drivers are allowed a maximum of 11 hours of drive time after 10 consecutive hours off duty, if they stay within the 14-hour window.

On the other hand, passenger-carrying drivers can drive up to 10 hours after eight consecutive hours off duty.

  • The 30-minute break rule?

According to the 30-minute break rule, drivers can’t log driving time if eight hours have passed since the last off-duty period of 30 consecutive minutes. Drivers can perform non-driving tasks after eight hours without taking a break, but they cannot drive.

Are you a short-haul driver?

The FMCSA rules and regulations state that you are a short-haul driver, if:

  • Start and return to the same location within twelve (12) hours of duty time.
  • Maintain your time-clock function.
  • Do not drive for more than eleven (11) hours.
  • Have ten (10) consecutive hours in off duty between shifts.
  • Operate within a 100 air-mile radius from your starting location (CDL driver)
  • Operate within a 150 air-mile radius (non-CDL drivers)
  • Does not drive through a state that requires a CDL for the vehicle they drive

The 16-hour short-haul exemption – Do you qualify?

The FMCSA implemented a hours of service exemption allowing short-haul drivers to extend their 14-hour driving window by two hours each week.

This could apply to you if you are a short-haul driver and report back to the same work location each day, you might be able to take advantage of the 16-hour short haul exemption.

The exemption doesn’t extend the 11-hour daily driving limit but does provide you with up to 16 hours to complete your workday.

ELDs and short-haul exemptions

In most cases, a driver that qualifies for the 100 or 150 air mile radius is exempt from the upcoming ELD mandate, but there are exceptions.

The final regulation says if you are running short haul, you are not required to maintain Record of Duty Status (RODS) and, therefore, do not need to log your hours with an ELD, unless you break the rule more than eight (8) times in a 30-day rolling period.

If you do break the rule more than eight times, you will need an ELD to log your hours until you get back to the number of eight or fewer in a 30-day period.

Learn why ELDs can be an excellent resource for a short-haul fleet.

Do you still need an ELD? We can help you out!


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe, compliant, and on the road.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Approaching AOBRD deadline will require use of ELDs


The electronic logging device (ELD) mandate, which was put into action almost two years ago, will take full effect on December 16, 2019, which is the AOBRD deadline.

When the ELD mandate was introduced, an April 1, 2018 deadline was set to switch over to an ELD. The only exception was for those carriers that were using automatic onboard recording devices, also known as AOBRDs, on or before December 17, 2017.

Many have either started the switch or already made it long ago, however if you have not started, you should start now as the process is not as seamless as one might think.

Why is it important to switch from AOBRD to ELD now?

Carriers that have not updated their AOBRDs may run into some challenges, including training drivers to use ELDs and teaching office employees how to transfer logs.

Certain parts of the process can take longer than expected, as well as the potential for suppliers to run low on ELDs or take longer to fix glitches if too many attempt to switch at once.

It may also be difficult to get all drivers into a training class or webinar at the same time. In addition, it will not be a one-time training session. ELD training will need to be ongoing for all drivers, as mistakes will be made, and issues will arise.

Any difficulties may be answered on the FMCSAs ELD rule FAQ section.

What issues are drivers having?

Continuous education of drivers will be necessary. One area that drivers are running into problems with in the switch from AOBRDs to ELDs is unassigned drive time.

The issue comes in when a driver on the road rejects the unassigned drive time, which causes it to enter into the unassigned driver account in the admin system. This forces the company to assign it to a specific driver or explain why it couldn’t be assigned, with no other option.

With AOBRDs, users could create a generic driver account for road tests or yard moves; pretty much all the odd miles that show up in a fleet.

How do you install and train truck drivers on ELDs?

ELD install tips

If you need to manage the installation of ELDs on a large fleet of trucks, some good steps to follow include:

  1. Run a daily report and determine which trucks were in the yard and which ones are coming to the yard.
  2. Then, send a firmware update from your computer to a specific ELD unit.
  3. Then, go out to the truck, allow the firmware to download.
  4. Follow the automated installation steps on the tablet.
  5. Reboot the tablet two or three times and cycle the engine a few times.
  6. Test drive the truck ensuring everything was downloaded properly and you are finished.

ELD training tips

Drivers will need to be trained on ELDs, so a few tips in training them to make the process more seamless are to:

  1. train drivers one-on-one as often as possible.
  2. ensure drivers know how to log into the system.
  3. point out any visual changes and emphasize the sensitivity of the ELD.
  4. emphasize that—before doing anything with the truck—the driver must know how long they have been off duty, as well as how many hours they will be working that day and week.
  5. perform daily log audits and contact and train drivers with issues.
  6. be repetitive.

Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs)

What ELD should you use?

We searched high and low for a partner in the ELD industry, testing over 20 ELD systems, before we decided to choose Pedigree as our preferred ELD.

A few reasons why we chose Pedigree include:

  • their excellent price point that we at CNS could stand behind.
  • their dedicated team of technicians looking to improve efficiency and streamline the customer’s operation.
  • their knowledge on DOT rules and regulations to keep you and your ELD running smooth.
  • their “OneView” platform and infrastructure was far greater compared to the competition.
  • the ability to manage our client’s use of ELDs and offer them customer support directly.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

DOT hours-of-service: Comment extension


The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) wants more time to collect and analyze comments on the FMCSA’s proposal for changes to the hours-of-service rules.

The CVSA sent a formal petition to the FMCSA requesting a 45-day extension to the comment period regarding a notice of proposed rulemaking aimed at providing commercial motor vehicle drivers more hours-of-service flexibility.

In early August the FMCSA proposed five changes to the hours-of-service regulations:

  1. 30-minute break requirement: Changes will allow drivers to satisfy the required break using on duty, not driving status, rather than off duty.
  2. Sleeper berth exception: Changes will allow drivers to split the required 10 hours off duty into two periods.
    • One period must contain at least 7 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth.
    • The other period cannot be less than 2 consecutive hours, either off duty or in the sleeper berth.
    • Note: Neither period would count against the driver’s 14‑hour driving window
  3. 30-minute to 3-hour off-duty break: Changes will allow drivers one off-duty break of at least 30 minutes and no more than 3 hours, that pauses the driver’s 14-hour driving window
    • Note: Driver must take 10 consecutive hours off-duty at the end of the work shift.
  4. Adverse driving conditions exception: Changes will extend the maximum window during which driving is permitted by two hours.
  5. Short-haul exception: Changes will lengthen the drivers’ maximum on‑duty period from 12 to 14 hours and extends the operating distance limit from 100 to 150 air miles.

CVSA fully supports FMCSA in their request for comments, however, Executive Director Collin Mooney said that 45 days is not enough time to prepare and approve comments on such a complicated and important issue. Mooney stated that it is imperative that stakeholders provide more time.

The August 22, 2019 proposal opened a 45-day comment period allowing comments on regulations.gov using docket number FMCSA-2018-0248 until Oct. 7, however the extension would leave the comment period open until November 21, 2019.

Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these Hours-of-Service rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

US DOT seeks comment on Agriculture HOS regulations


The US DOT’s Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is seeking public comment to revise the hours-of-service (HOS) regulations for agricultural commodity or livestock definitions.

The FMCSA partnered with the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) to provide clarity for the nation’s farmers and commercial drivers, eliminate confusion and align the agencies’ agricultural commodity definitions.

With the American agriculture industry contributing more than $1 trillion annually to the US economy, the FMCSA recognizes the importance of the agricultural industry.

The FMCSA is determined to find a balance that provides more flexibility to those hauling agricultural commodities.

Current regulations have certain restrictions lacking the flexibility that farmers and commercial drivers need due to the unique realities of hauling agriculture commodities.

Currently, during harvesting and planting seasons, drivers transporting agricultural commodities, including livestock, are exempt from the HOS requirements.

The HOS exemption is called a short haul exemption and applies when the destination of the commodity is within a 150-air-mile radius from the source.

Each individual state is currently determining HOS requirements for agricultural commodities.

The advanced rule (ANPRM) authored by FMCSA was prompted by indications that the current definition of these terms may not be understood or enforced consistently when determining whether the HOS exemption applies.

The FMCSA is encouraging all commercial motor vehicle stakeholders to provide feedback on how the current definitions impact safety, compliance, and enforcement. More specifically, the FMCSA wants to hear from those transporting agricultural commodities and livestock.

Canadian ELD mandate for commercial vehicles


Commercial driver fatigue is a long-standing road safety issue that the United States has addressed through the use of ELDs. Canada is following suit with the Canadian ELD mandate.

The Canadian government is committed to improving road safety for all Canadians and is falling in line with the US to address this issue through the implementation of the Canadian ELD mandate.

As a result of a longstanding collaboration among all levels of government and industry partners, this past June, the Honorable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, mandated the use of ELDs or electronic logging devices by federally regulated commercial truck and bus operators.

The Canadian ELD mandate requiring the use of ELDs will go into effect on June 12, 2021 and will replace paper-based daily logbooks.

What is an ELD or electronic logging device?

Electronic logging devices are tamper-resistant devices that are integrated into commercial vehicle engines. The devices track when and how long drivers have been at the wheel, and ensure they are complying with the Commercial Vehicle Drivers Hours of Service Regulations.

There are many advantages to using ELDs, but the main purpose is to ensure that commercial drivers remain within their daily driving limit and accurately log their working hours. If commercial drivers are not within the regulated limit, there may be fines associated with the violation.

The use of ELDs also reduces administrative burdens, such as eliminating the need for paper daily logs and reducing the time enforcement officers need to verify regulatory compliance.

These new electronic logs for truckers are aligned with the United States road safety regulations and will support economic growth, trade, and transportation on both sides of the border.

After extensive research and consultation, Transport Canada has implemented a third-party certification process will be put in place to ensure that the electronic logging devices will be accurate and reliable.

Other important facts about the Canadian ELD mandate:

  • Transport Canada is committed to aligning with vehicle regulations in the United States.
  • Aligning Canadian and US electronic logging device regulations will allow Canadian and US operators to use the same logging device in both countries.
  • Transport Canada estimates that requiring the use of electronic logs for truckers will reduce the risk of fatigue-related collisions by approximately 10 percent.

More driver flexibility after hours of service changes


5 major DOT hours of service changes

In an effort to improve safety and provide more flexibility to commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has released a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) that proposes changes to the hours of service (HOS) rules.

In 2018, the FMCSA release an Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) on Hours of Service of Drivers and requested public comment on portions of the HOS rules to alleviate unnecessary burdens placed on drivers.

The FMCSA proposed changes focus on the five areas below:

  1. 30-minute break requirement: Changes will allow drivers to satisfy the required break using on duty, not driving status, rather than off duty.
  2. Sleeper berth exception: Changes will allow drivers to split the required 10 hours off duty into two periods.
    • One period must contain at least 7 consecutive hours in the sleeper berth.
    • The other period cannot be less than 2 consecutive hours, either off duty or in the sleeper berth.
    • Note: Neither period would count against the driver’s 14‑hour driving window
  3. 30-minute to 3-hour off-duty break: Changes will allow drivers one off-duty break of at least 30 minutes and no more than 3 hours, that pauses the driver’s 14-hour driving window
    1. Note: Driver must take 10 consecutive hours off-duty at the end of the work shift.
  4. Adverse driving conditions exception: Changes will extend the maximum window during which driving is permitted by two hours.
  5. Short-haul exception: Changes will lengthen the drivers’ maximum on‑duty period from 12 to 14 hours and extends the operating distance limit from 100 to 150 air miles.

The proposed rules are open for public comment and the FMCSA Administrator, Raymond Martinez, is encouraging all drivers and CMV stakeholders to submit thoughts and opinions on the hours of service changes within the 45-day timeframe they have allotted. There is potential for the comment period to be extended.

Pausing the 14-hour clock has been discussed since last 2018 and may now become a reality.

>>> Final rule goes to White House as of March 2020 <<<


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these Hours-of-Service rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.