Are you ready for a compliance review?


Have you been selected for a compliance review?

Being selected for a Compliance Review (CR) as a motor carrier can bring a lot of stress and headaches. But much of this anxiety lies in being uninformed about the auditing process.

Let’s look at what a Compliance Review entails and how you and your company can prepare for one.

What is a Compliance Review?

A Compliance Review is basically a checkup to evaluate performance of the FMCSA regulations and record-keeping to determine if safety management controls are compliant.

It is important to “do your homework” in advance, in case you do get audited, which is very possible.

Two important things you should you know if you are being audited?

  1. Know the regulations you are subject to as a motor carrier
  2. Know which records an Auditor will expect to review

6 Inspection Categories of a Compliance Review

Each category is called a “factor,” and is rated as:

  • satisfactory
  • conditional
  • unsatisfactory

1. General requirements

  • Documentation of proper liability coverage for the type of carrier and cargo. Refer to Section 387.9 of the FMCSR for details.
  • Forms CS-90 or MCS-82, signed by an insurance provider representative.
  • Vehicle markings: CMVs marked on two sides with the name listed on the MCS-150 form, and the DOT number preceded by “USDOT.”
  • Training records: Keep detailed records of all transportation safety training. Be able to show training for any employee involved in compliance.

2. Driver qualifications

  • Driver licenses must equal the vehicle class being driven and have the correct endorsements.
    • be sure to track your employees license expiration dates.
    • have a CDL Driver drug and alcohol testing program in place.
    • written policy on your testing program is required. Distributed this policy to all CDL drivers and get a signed receipt from all drivers to keep in your files.
    • if safety function duties require PART 40 Drug and Alcohol testing, then verify past three years of employment. Required tests include:
      • Pre-employment drug test, Post-accident drug and alcohol, Random drug and alcohol, Reasonable suspicion
  • Documentation for employees retained after a positive drug test result.
  • Driver qualification file should be well-organized and include the following items:
    • application for employment
    • employment verification from previous three years with safety performance history and drug/alcohol test results, if applicable.
    • Motor Vehicle Record (MVR) from past three years
    • Road test and certification
    • DOT physical certification from past three years
    • entry-level driver training, if needed
    • state agencies 3-year driving record inquiry
    • annual written driver statement of violations
    • signed annual reviews from motor carrier from past three years
    • waivers (if any)

For a complete list of documents that should be included in the Driver Qualification File, print out this handy checklist. But the items above are ones required for an audit.

3. Operational

  • 6 months of driver logs and supporting documents.
  • motor carriers must comply with record-keeping requirements even when using a logging exception.

4. Vehicle requirements

  • 12 months of vehicle maintenance file for any CMV under motor carrier control for 30 consecutive days. Include the following information:
    • Motor carrier number (or license plate number)
    • Model and year
    • Vehicle identification number (VIN) or serial number
    • Tire size
    • Owner (if not the motor carrier)
  • proof of periodic inspection (or approved sticker).
  • certification of anyone performing CMV brake system work.
  • 90 days’ worth of post-trip inspection reports, with mechanic signature that defects were corrected, signature of the next driver’s pre-trip inspection, and name of individual who accepted vehicle back into service.

Review Part 396 of the FMCSA for full details

5. Hazardous Materials

  • Shipping papers and emergency response information (from shipper). Retain these for one year (three years for hazardous waste).
  • Refer to 49 CFR Section 172.203 for full details of what must be on shipping papers.

6. Accidents

  • Accident register listing all accidents as defined by Section 390.5 of the FMCSR (a.k.a. “DOT recordable accidents”)
  • Per Section 390.15, the register must include this information:
    • Accident date and hour
    • Location city, state, and address
    • Number of deaths
    • Number of non-fatal injuries
    • Hazardous materials (not including fuel spills)
    • Driver’s name
    • Copy of State or Insurance Report
  • Maintain records on the accident register for three years.
  • View a sample accident register

Be ready for a Compliance Review at all times

Maintaining proper record-keeping and organization is key to being ready for a Compliance Review at all times.

If you maintain accurate records, and keep your files up to date, then the next time you see “You’ve been selected,” all the required materials will be at hand. No doubt, this will relieve stress and help you pass a Compliance Review quickly and without issue.




DOT Audit Services

CNS offers several different types of audit services, including:

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe, compliant, and on the road.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

2020 Clearinghouse Rule changes: Forms Reporting (part 2)


The new 2020 Clearinghouse Rule went into effect on January 6, 2020. Even as new laws are rolled out, there can be last minute changes. At CNS, we want to be sure we’re keeping you up to date on the latest news and information regarding the Clearinghouse, as well as other U.S. DOT regulations.

On December 17, 2019, the U.S. Department of Transportation released a bulletin changing the data requirements on two of their forms relating to the Clearinghouse.

Here’s what is important to know about the upcoming change in recording information on these forms.

Which forms are being changed?

The two forms being changed are:

What has changed on the forms?

The main change to these forms is the way drivers are identified in the form when positive test results are reported.

Currently, you can use either the driver’s social security number (SSN) or their employee Identification number (EIN) when recording on these forms.

Effective January 6, 2020, you will be required to use the commercial driver’s license number (CDL) only when positive drug or alcohol tests are reported via these two forms.

Who do these form changes affect?

  • Employers
  • Consortia/Third Party Administrators (C/TPAs)
  • Collection sites
  • Laboratories
  • Medical Review Officers (MROs)

How can I stay compliant with this change?

Our Compliance Specialists can assist you with any questions you might have. Please call us at 888.260.9448 or email us at info@cnsprotects.com.

Employers should check data systems to ensure compliance

The best way to ensure compliance when reporting positive drug and alcohol test results to the Clearinghouse via the CCF and ATF forms is to check your current data systems. Moving forward, data systems need the capability to input an identification number of up to 25 characters in order to enter a CDL number.

Employers must annotate accurately

When completing the CCF or the ATF, the entry personnel “must annotate the driver’s CDL number and State of Issuance in Step 1, Section C of the CCF or Step 1B of the ATF for each FMCSA-regulated test.”

Medical Review Officers (MROs) should follow up on missing data

When an MRO receives a CCF form without a driver’s CDL number and State of Issuance, they should follow up to obtain this missing data. Contact the driver, the driver’s employee, or the designated employer representative to obtain the accurate information.

The MRO should report all verified positive tests results in the Clearinghouse.

Stay updated on the new Clearinghouse Rule

As the new Clearinghouse rolls out in 2020 and into the future, there may be more changes and adjustments. The CNS blog will keep you updated on all news, changes, and support you and your company in staying compliant with the new Clearinghouse Rule.

Please be sure your company and your employees register with the Clearinghouse by January 6, 2020 to avoid delays in processing forms and new hires.

For additional information on the Clearinghouse, including FAQ and Registration information, visit https://clearinghouse.fmcsa.dot.gov.


Drug and Alcohol Services

Compliance Navigation Specialists offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Administration Services (C/TPA).

We work with Quest Diagnostics and have over 10,000 locations available for testing.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Comply with 2020 mandatory Clearinghouse Rule (part 1)


On January 6, 2020, the Clearinghouse Rule, implemented by Congress in 2016, goes into mandatory effect.

How does this impact drivers and companies?

It depends on the size of your fleet, but one fact is clear, every carrier must participate.

Of course, all drivers with a CDL have already had to comply with the FMCSA Drug and Alcohol regulations. Until now, all CDL drivers should have been in a random drug-and-alcohol consortium. However, the new Rule goes a step further than that.

Beginning January 6, 2020, all drivers holding a CDL are responsible for setting up an account in the Clearinghouse, including large-to-mid-sized fleets and owner-operators.

If you need assistance setting up an account in the Clearinghouse, please call us at 888.260.9448 or email us at info@cnsprotects.com.

The FMCSA is aware that not all CDL drivers are currently registered in a drug-and-alcohol consortium. With the new regulations finally going into effect, it will be virtually impossible for owner-operators to avoid being in the Clearinghouse.

For instance, all drivers need to have an annual query (an electronic check) run in the Clearinghouse. Therefore, an owner-operator, employing themselves as a single-driver, must hire a consortium or third-party administrator (C/TPA) to run a query.

Or, a driver looking to switch employers needs to be in the Clearinghouse for a prospective employer to run a full query. Queries will show whether there is anything in the Clearinghouse on that driver that requires further investigation or prohibits them from performing safety-sensitive functions.

We offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Services and are a certified consortium and third-party administrator (C/TPA). If you are in need consortium management, contact us at 888.260.9448 or info@cnsprotects.com.

What information is stored in the Clearinghouse?

The CDL Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse will store three years of data on drivers including positive drug tests, test refusals, and alcohol violations. Complete and incomplete return-to-duty processes will also be recorded. This information will remain in the Clearinghouse database for three years.

Employers and fleets may run two types of queries:

  • Full queries (required for new hires) supply all information details
  • Limited queries (required for all drivers annually) will only reveal whether or not the database contains any information on the driver; carriers can ask for full queries after that finding

Ensure compliance with new FMCSA Drug and Alcohol Regulations

Now that the Clearinghouse Rule becomes mandatory in less than a month, here’s what drivers and companies can do to become compliant:

CDL Drivers

All CDL drivers need to have an account for any prospective or current employer to run the required new-hire queries. Drivers can also view records and petition for any corrections as needed.

If you are a CDL driver, you can follow the steps below.

  1. Register an account in the Clearinghouse
  2. Provide electronic consent to release information during a full query
    1. If a driver does not give consent within 24 hours, they are disqualified from driving until authorization is given
  3. Review records for accuracy
  4. Identify a Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) to report on return-to-duty activities if unresolved violations are on record

Owner-operators (one-truck/independent)

Any single-driver operation must comply with requirements for BOTH employees (drivers) and employers (fleets/companies).

If you are a one-truck or independent owner-operator, you can follow the steps below.

  1. Register an account in the Clearinghouse as a company
  2. Designate a consortium or third-party administrator (C/TPA) to handle queries. This is required of all owner-operators (Contact Compliance Navigation Specialists)
  3. Notify the consortium (or TPA) that they are the designee.
  4. Amend any contracts to reflect the designated consortium (Designation and contract amendments will be two separate steps, and both must be carried out)
  5. Purchase bundles of queries for the consortium to query the database on an annual basis

OPTIONAL: Invite assistants/other employees to allow them access to the Clearinghouse on your behalf. They should register as part of your company.

Owner-operators (leased)

If you are a leased owner-operator, you can follow the steps below.

  1. Register an account in the Clearinghouse
  2. Although not explicitly stated in the Rule, an account is needed for switching fleets, as each new fleet will need to make a query
  3. Provide electronic consent for full queries

Small and large fleet operators

The two main changes for small and large fleet operators are amending policies and employee information.

If you are a small or large fleet operator, you can follow the steps below.

  1. Register as an employer in the Clearinghouse
  2. Purchase bundles of queries
  3. Amend fleet policies to reflect that any positive drug tests, test refusals, or violations will be submitted to the Clearinghouse
  4. Explain these new policies to drivers prior to January 6, 2020
  5. Determine if administration of drug-screening will be handled in-house or outsourced. If outsourced, designate the provider in the Clearinghouse and contract them as a designee (Designation and contract amendments will be two separate steps, and both must be carried out)
  6. Continue to call applicant’s prior employees to ask about failed or refused drug tests until 2023. Since the Clearinghouse will not reflect past data, it will take three years until the Clearinghouse is fully up-to-date.

OPTIONAL: Designate a consortium or third-party administrator (C/TPA) to handle queries.

Learn more about changes to Clearinghouse reporting forms


Drug and Alcohol Services

Register now to ensure compliance with FMCSA regulations

Compliance Navigation Specialists offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Administration Services (C/TPA).

We work with Quest Diagnostics and have over 10,000 locations available for testing.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

FMCSA requires background checks for hazmat CDL endorsement


Hazmat CDL endorsement and Background Checks


Two rules that have been in place since 2003 and 2005 were recently finalized by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and went into effect on November 1, 2019. The rules concern the passing of a mandatory background check for truck drivers interested in adding or renewing a hazmat endorsement on their CDL.

As mentioned above, the background checks are mandatory and are administered by the Department of Homeland Security, with two exemptions, including state drivers with a valid transportation security card or Transportation Worker Identification Card (TWIC).

Rule #1: Hazmat background check

A provision to the final rule was published in 2003 prohibiting states from issuing, renewing, transferring or upgrading a CDL with a hazmat endorsement for truck drivers that have not successfully passed a background check by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) that clears them as a security risk.

Rule #2: Background check notice

In 2005, another provision to the final rule was published, reducing the amount of required notice a state must provide a truck driver that a background check will be performed for a hazmat endorsement renewal.

For example, if a driver’s hazmat endorsement is up to expire in the coming year, a state must notify the driver of the required background check at least 180 days, or 6 months, before the date of expiration for the CDL or hazmat endorsement.

Do you already have your hazmat endorsement?

Current drivers need not worry about the finalization of these rules as it has no bearing on current drivers or carriers, since the rules have been in place since 2003 and 2005.


Hazmat and DOT Training

We are fully capable to handle your HAZMAT compliance training or other DOT training.

There are many rules, regulations and requirements in each state for authorities to keep track of when it comes to hauling hazardous material. If you are not DOT compliant, it could be detrimental to your company, as fines and penalties can be upwards of $180,000.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Short-haul exemption: 100 air-mile radius


Are you 100 air-mile exempt?

What is an air mile?

An “air mile” is a nautical mile measuring a straight distance between two points, excluding any twists or turns.

What is the short-haul exemption?

If you are a short-haul driver or fleet, in addition to time restrictions, there are two types of short-haul exemptions related to distance, the 100 air-mile exemption and the 150 air-mile exemption.

  • 100 air-mile exemption

The exemption applies to CDL drivers and to qualify they must remain operating within a 100 air-mile radius, return to the same work reporting location, go off duty within 12 hours and keep time cards with their start times, end times and total hours worked for the day.

  • 150 air-mile exemption

This exemption is slightly different in that it applies to non-CDL drivers and instead of the operating radius being 100 air-miles, it is 150 air-miles. Similarly, drivers are required to keep timecards, return to the same work reporting location, and they do not drive through a state that requires a CDL for the vehicle they drive.

Exceeding the short-haul limitation

A driver may violate the short-haul limitations by going over the radius limit or exceeding the time it takes to return to their reporting location.

If this happens, drivers are required to maintain a Record of Duty Status (RODS) and more importantly, if they maintain a RODS for more than 8 days in a 30-day period, they must have an ELD because the mandate exemption does not apply after that 8 days.

The 8-day rule is one of the biggest issues for any short-haul fleet because they are unable to determine if they will hit that 8-day limitation. It is important to note that it is nearly impossible to implement an ELD on short notice, therefore, many questionable short-haul fleets are beginning to install ELDs.

Verifying compliance?

If you have drivers that exempt, it is imperative that you check time records to verify compliance with time and distance restrictions.

If a driver is in violation, you must also verify that they followed proper procedure by taking a 30-minute break and submitting their daily log.

If your company is audited and you or your drivers are found to be misusing these exemptions, you will be cited for each violation every day it occurred which can lead to a rather large fine.

ELDs and short-haul exemptions

In most cases, a driver that qualifies for the 100 or 150 air mile radius is exempt from the upcoming ELD mandate, but there are exceptions.

The final regulation says if you are running short haul, you are not required to maintain Record of Duty Status (RODS) and, therefore, do not need to log your hours with an ELD, unless you break the rule more than eight (8) times in a 30-day rolling period.

If you do break the rule more than eight times, you will need an ELD to log your hours until you get back to the number of eight or fewer in a 30-day period.

Although not always required, ELDs can be an excellent resource for a short-haul fleet. Constant awareness of a driver’s distance, eliminating any concerns of going beyond the radius limit, and monitoring driver scorecards are just two of many benefits.

Do you still need an ELD? We can help you out!


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe, compliant, and on the road.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

HOS short-haul exemptions and HOS compliance


What are short-haul exemptions?

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) developed several Hours-of-Service rules and regulations with a goal for these HOS rules to minimize driver fatigue and improve road safety for everyone.

However, the FMCSA has created certain exemptions giving drivers and carriers flexibility, depending on their situation. Different rules apply to passenger-carrying drivers, property-carrying drivers and drivers of hazardous materials.

Considering all of the potential HOS changes and so we are on the same page, we will discuss a few important Hours-of-Service rules, including the 14-hour rule, the 11-hour rule and the 30-minute break.

What are 3 important hours-of-service rules?

  • The 14-hour rule?

The 14-hour rule disallows a property-carrying driver from driving longer than 14 consecutive hours after starting duty. The driver cannot continue driving until they have taken ten (10) consecutive hours off-duty.

Passenger-carrying motor vehicles are limited to 15 cumulative hours. This differs from the 14 consecutive hours of property-carrying drivers.

For both property-carrying and passenger-carrying vehicles, off-duty time does not extend the 14-hour period.

  • The 11-hour rule?

The 11-hour rule states that property-carrying drivers are allowed a maximum of 11 hours of drive time after 10 consecutive hours off duty, if they stay within the 14-hour window.

On the other hand, passenger-carrying drivers can drive up to 10 hours after eight consecutive hours off duty.

  • The 30-minute break rule?

According to the 30-minute break rule, drivers can’t log driving time if eight hours have passed since the last off-duty period of 30 consecutive minutes. Drivers can perform non-driving tasks after eight hours without taking a break, but they cannot drive.

Are you a short-haul driver?

The FMCSA rules and regulations state that you are a short-haul driver, if:

  • Start and return to the same location within twelve (12) hours of duty time.
  • Maintain your time-clock function.
  • Do not drive for more than eleven (11) hours.
  • Have ten (10) consecutive hours in off duty between shifts.
  • Operate within a 100 air-mile radius from your starting location (CDL driver)
  • Operate within a 150 air-mile radius (non-CDL drivers)
  • Does not drive through a state that requires a CDL for the vehicle they drive

The 16-hour short-haul exemption – Do you qualify?

The FMCSA implemented a hours of service exemption allowing short-haul drivers to extend their 14-hour driving window by two hours each week.

This could apply to you if you are a short-haul driver and report back to the same work location each day, you might be able to take advantage of the 16-hour short haul exemption.

The exemption doesn’t extend the 11-hour daily driving limit but does provide you with up to 16 hours to complete your workday.

ELDs and short-haul exemptions

In most cases, a driver that qualifies for the 100 or 150 air mile radius is exempt from the upcoming ELD mandate, but there are exceptions.

The final regulation says if you are running short haul, you are not required to maintain Record of Duty Status (RODS) and, therefore, do not need to log your hours with an ELD, unless you break the rule more than eight (8) times in a 30-day rolling period.

If you do break the rule more than eight times, you will need an ELD to log your hours until you get back to the number of eight or fewer in a 30-day period.

Learn why ELDs can be an excellent resource for a short-haul fleet.

Do you still need an ELD? We can help you out!


Stay DOT compliant

Knowing these rules and regulations will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe, compliant, and on the road.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

DOT drug test: Who, what, when and how


As directed by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) and the Department of Transportation (DOT), all CDL drivers and their employers are required to follow the rules related to DOT drug tests.

Who is given a DOT drug test?

Drivers of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) are required to take a drug test and their employers must ensure their drivers are tested before operating a CMV.

Below is a full list of those required to be tested.

  • employers of CDL drivers operating CMVs on public roads
  • CDL drivers who operate CMVs on public roads
  • interstate motor carriers
  • intrastate motor carriers
  • federal, state, and local governments
  • civic organizations (disabled veteran transport, boy/girl scouts, etc.)
  • faith-based organizations

What substances are tested?

The DOT requires testing of alcohol and five drug classes, including:

  1. Marijuana
  2. Cocaine
  3. Opiates
  4. Amphetamines or methamphetamines
  5. PCP

Alcohol tests will identify alcohol in the system at .02 BAC and more.                      

Motor carriers can also implement a separate testing program in addition to, and distinct from, the required DOT testing program, under which they are able to test for other drugs.

What types of DOT drug tests are there and when are they given?

DOT drug and alcohol tests are given in several different scenarios, including:

  1. pre-employment – before starting work as a CDL driver and operating a CMV
  2. post-accident – drug and alcohol tests may be required after an accident depending on the circumstances. Learn when post-accident drug tests are required.
  3. random – random testing programs are required by law for all DOT-regulated motor carriers
  4. reasonable suspicion – if a driver appears to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol, an area in which supervisors must be trained in identifying.
  5. return-to-duty – required of drivers who tested positive, refused, or violated the law
  6. follow-up – required of drivers who tested positive, refused, or violated the law

What is the DOT drug testing process?

The DOT has a strict process for administering drug tests and the steps are the same for all six types.

  1. Go to the collection site with a valid ID and provide a sample before leaving.
  2. Provide your urine sample in the designated collection area. The collection process will be private unless required, as in a return-to-duty or follow-up test.
  3. When finished with the sample, provide the container to the collector and observe as they split the sample into two containers, seal them with tamper-evident tape and allow you to sign the tape before you leave.
  4. Provide your contact information and verify your name and date of birth so the Medical Review Officer (MRO) can get in touch with the results.

Drug and alcohol testing

Where does a driver get a DOT drug test?

Compliance Navigation Specialists works with Quest Diagnostics and have over 10,000 locations available for testing, whether it is necessary after an accident or for a pre-employment screening.

We also offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Administration Services (C/TPA) for companies that are regulated by Federal and State government.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

DOT post-accident drug test requirements


As a DOT-regulated motor carrier, it is extremely important to ensure all CDL drivers are in top physical and mental condition while operating these highly complex and powerful commercial motor vehicles. Driver awareness of post-accident drug test requirements is also crucial.

Although we do everything possible to prevent accidents, there are times when circumstances are beyond our control, making the post-accident steps one of the most important pieces of knowledge for a CDL driver. A driver’s responsibilities do not stop at the site of the accident.

What are the different types of DOT drug tests?

There are several situations in which a DOT drug test is required, including:

  1. pre-employment – before starting work as a CDL driver
  2. post-accident – applies to certain situations following an accident
  3. random – random testing program require by law for all DOT-regulated motor carriers
  4. reasonable suspicion – if a driver appears to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol
  5. return-to-duty – required of drivers who tested positive, refused, or violated the law
  6. follow-up – required of drivers who tested positive, refused, or violated the law

When is a post-accident drug and alcohol test required?

Drug and alcohol tests are not required after every accident. A CDL driver is required to take a post-accident drug test if:

  • the accident results in one or more fatalities
  • injury was incurred that required medical treatment away from the scene and the driver received a citation (Note: no citation = no drug and alcohol test)
  • any vehicle is towed, and the driver received a citation (Note: no citation = no drug and alcohol test)

Also, it is important to note that a driver is still liable to take a drug and alcohol test if a citation issued within 32 hours of the accident. If a citation is issued after the 8 hour mark, the motor carrier must make a note saying “a citation was not issued until this time, which was after the 8 hours for alcohol testing.”

How much time do I have to get a post-accident drug test?

A driver has 2 hours in which an alcohol test should be completed, however it must be completed within 8 hours. If the driver goes over the 2-hour mark, they must provide an explanation as to why there was a delay and the motor carrier must provide a written explanation and keep in their company files.

A drug test needs to be completed as soon as possible; however, it must be completed within 32 hours. At times there might be a delay in the issuance of a citation, however as long as the citation is issued with 32 hours, a drug and alcohol test is required.

Drivers often run into issues with meeting these timeframes because they will be kept at the scene of an accident for several hours or an investigation must be completed to determine if the driver was at fault.

What if I miss the maximum time frame allowed?

If a driver does not get his post-accident drug test before the maximum allowed time, the company needs to make a note in their files as to the reason why, however it is too late and the company will be out of compliance and face fines and audit penalties, so completing the drug test within the allowed time is imperative.

What about on-site tests, such as a DUI test or breathalyzer?

If an officer conducts a DUI test or a breathalyzer at the scene of an accident, a driver is still required to follow protocol and get an official drug and alcohol test within the allotted time frames. An on-site test by an officer will not fulfill the required DOT post-accident drug test as these tests do not follow DOT rules and regulations.


Drug and alcohol testing

Where does a driver get a DOT drug test?

Compliance Navigation Specialists works with Quest Diagnostics and have over 10,000 locations available for testing, whether it is necessary after an accident or for a pre-employment screening.

For post-accident alcohol testing, CNS will coordinate a location for you.

We also offer a comprehensive Drug and Alcohol Consortium Administration Services (C/TPA) for companies that are regulated by Federal and State government.

If you have any questions, call 888.260.9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

Utah increases International Registration Plan fees


As of January 1, 2020, Utah’s International Registration Plan (IRP) fees will increase for vehicles with a registered weight ranging from 0 to 80,000 pounds.

The registration fee for vehicles with a registered weight of 0 to 12,000 pounds will increase from $45 to $46. Vehicles with a registered weight of 12,001 to 80,000 pounds will have an increase of $1.50.

The fee change goes into effect at the beginning of 2020 and will apply to all supplements, renewals, new accounts or any account activity after the effective date of January 1, 2020.

International registration plan fee increases were also announced for Wisconsin, Nevada and North Dakota in August 2019.

Audit services

The long list of rules and regulations involved with the International Registration Plan (IRP) can be difficult to follow. Failure to stay up to date with your registration fee or changes to those rules and regulations can lead to the failure of an IRP audit.

All of our services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and DOT compliant, which is why we offer mock audits and management that help avoid these types of issues.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.

CVSA international truck inspection results for 2019


On June 4-6, 2019—as part of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) International Roadcheck—67,072 truck inspections were conducted, removing 12,019 vehicles and 2,784 drivers from roads across the US and Canada.

The International Roadcheck is conducted annually and is meant to remove unsafe commercial motor vehicles (CMV) and drivers from roads. During this 72-hour inspection, 17.9% of vehicles and 4.2% of drivers were placed out of service.

The basis for violations comes from the CVSA North American Standard Out-of-Service Criteria.

Inspection levels

There are eight different levels of inspection that the CVSA follows, however the truck inspections in this roadcheck were only subjected to the North American Standard (NAS) Level I, II, and III Inspections.

  • NAS Level I Inspection –includes a 37-step procedure examining the driver operating requirements and vehicle mechanical fitness.
  • NAS Level II Inspection—includes anything that can be inspected without getting under the CMV.
  • NAS Level III Inspection—includes a review of driver requirements, such as the license, cargo and vehicle documentation, record of duty status, seat belt usage, etc.

There were 60,058 Level I, II, and III Inspections conducted in the US and 7,014 in Canada. Respectively, the vehicle and driver out-of-service rate for the US was 17.7% and 4.4% and 19.9% and 2% for Canada.

Inspection focus

Inspections focused on violations related to steering and suspension systems, which resulted in identifying:

  • 408 steering violations or 2.5% of all out-of-service violations
  • 703 suspension violations or 4.3% of all out-of-service violations

Truck inspection results

The results for inspections are summarized below and include out-of-service vehicle, CMV driver, seatbelt, hazardous materials/dangerous goods and motorcoach violations.

There were 16,347 vehicles placed out-of-service with the top violation being for braking systems. The list below summarizes the remainder of recorded vehicle violations.

Out-of-service vehicle violations:

Vehicle violation category Number of violationsPercent of out-of-service violations
Braking systems 4578 28%
Tires and wheels 3156 19.3%
Brake adjustment 2801 17.1%
Cargo securement 1991 12.2%
Lighting devices 1875 11.5%
Suspensions 703 4.3%
Steering mechanisms 408 2.5%
Other 401 2.5%
Frames 170 1%
Coupling devices 124 .8%
Driveline/driveshaft 61 .4%
Fuel systems 44 .3%
Exhaust systems 35 .2%

There were 3,173 drivers placed out-of-service with the top violation being for hours of service. The list below summarizes the remainder of recorded driver violations.

Driver out-of-service violations:

Driver violation categoryNumber of violationsPercent of out-of-service violations
Hours of Service 1,179 37.2%
Wrong Class License 714 22.5%
False Logs 467 14.7%
Other 351 11.1%
Suspended License 232 7.3%
Drugs/Alcohol 99 3.1%
Expired License 94 3%
Violating License Restriction37 1.2%

There were 748 seat belt violations and out of 3,851 CMVs inspected, 527 violations for commercial motor vehicles transporting hazardous materials/dangerous goods with the most common violation being for loading. The list below summarizes the remainder of recorded violations for hazardous materials/dangerous goods.

Hazardous Materials/Dangerous GoodsNumber of violations Percent of out-of-service violations
Loading 7329.9%
Shipping papers 6125%
Placarding 46 18.9%
Markings 31 12.7%
Bulk packaging 15 6.1%
Package integrity 12 4.9%
Other 62.5%

During the International Roadcheck, 823 motorcoaches were inspected with 47 vehicles and 21 drivers being placed out of service. Inspections included a review of emergency exits, electrical cable sand systems in engine and battery compartments and seating.

Out-of-service orders and the number, type and severity of safety violations affect a motor carrier’s Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) score and its Safety Fitness Determination (SFD) rating.

Stay DOT compliant

Knowing what your CSA score is and how it affects your company and all of the requirements to pass inspections, whether it be for brake safety or suspension and steering, will allow you to stay compliant and plan your operations more efficiently.

All CNS services are geared toward keeping your trucking company safe and compliant so that you stay on the road and pass all truck inspections.

If you have any questions, call (888) 260-9448 or email at info@cnsprotects.com.