Spotted Lanternfly Permit

What is the Spotted Lanternfly?

The Spotted Lanternfly is an invasive planthopper native to China, India, Vietnam. It was first discovered in Pennsylvania in Berks County and has spread to other counties in the southeast portion of the Commonwealth. The insect has the potential to greatly impact agricultural crops such as grapes, hops and hardwoods. It is also reducing the quality of life for people living in heavily infested areas.

Counties are under quarantine:

Pennsylvania

Berks
Bucks
Carbon
Chester
Delaware
Dauphin
Lancaster
Lebanon
Lehigh
Monroe
Montgomery
Northampton
Philadelphia
Schuylkill

New Jersey

Mercer
Hunterdon
Warren

Virginia

Fredericks

Who needs a permit?

For businesses, agencies, and organizations, a Spotted Lanternfly permit is required for those located or working within the quarantine, who move vehicles, products or other conveyances within or out of the quarantine zone.

 

Permit Process:

  • No cost to business to obtain a permit
  • The permit process requires managers and/or supervisors to complete the online permit course to demonstrate a working knowledge and understanding of the pest and quarantine requirements.
  • The online course and exam are located on the Penn State Extension website: https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly-permit-training

 

Enforcement Start Date May 1, 2019

How Can CNS help?

As required, all employees that drive company vehicles will need to be trained on identifying and stopping the spread of the Spotted Lanternfly.  CNS is trained on the trainer requirements from the PA Department of Ag. CNS can train your drivers. This is a 35- 45 min course. Please note that a supervisor from your company will still be required to take the course from the Penn State Extension.

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CLASS B to CLASS A CDL GETS MORE STREAMLINED

Elaine L. Chao, US Transportation Secretary, said “Today’s action demonstrates the Department’s commitment to reducing regulatory burdens and addressing our nation’s shortage of commercial drivers” in reference to the FMCSA announcing today a final rule reducing costs and simplifying the process to upgrade a Class B Commercial Drivers License to a Class A CDL. By adopting a new Class A CDL theory instruction upgrade curriculum, the rule will save eligible driver trainees and motor carriers across the United States over $18 million annually.

FMCSA Administrator, Raymond P. Martinez, called the final rule “common-sense” and committed the FMCSA to “strategically reform burdensome regulations to improve the lives of ordinary Americans by saving them valuable time and money – while simultaneously maintaining the highest level of safety.”

FMCSA is amending the Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) regulations published on December 8, 2016 detailing the ELDT rule requires the same level of theory training for individuals obtaining a CDL for the first time as for those who already hold a Class B DEL and are upgrading to a Class A CDL. FMCSA recognizes that because Class B CDL holders have prior training or experience, they should not be required to complete the same level of theory training as individuals who have never earned a CDL.

View a copy of the final rule announced today.

AOBRD/ELD

At CNS 2019 Compliance Conference John Irwin CDS, Chief Executive Officer from Compliance Navigation Specialists discussed AOBRD transition to ELD. “The deadline is fast approaching which is December 16, 2019. Don’t wait until the last minute to make the switch. It will take some time to change your units out. Also it will take you time to learn a new system. Understanding the difference between them is key.” said John Irwin. Below is the chart that was shown in Mr. Irwin’s slides.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Determining Class of CDL Required

As a result of the Federal Commercial motor vehicle Safety
Act of 1986, Pennsylvania established a Commercial Driver
Licensing Program. This program has been developed to
improve driver quality, ensure commercial drivers have the
skills needed to operate commercial vehicles and to prevent
drivers from having more than one driver’s license. The
program requires you to have a CDL if you operate or plan
to operate any of the following Commercial motor vehicles
(CMVS):

a) A combination of vehicles with a gross combination
weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 pounds or more,
provided the vehicle being towed is in excess of
10,000 pounds.

b) A single vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating
(GVWR) of 26,001 or more pounds.

c) A vehicle designed to transport 16 or more persons,
including the driver.

d) A school bus designed to carry 11 passengers or more,
including the driver.

e) Any size vehicle, which transports hazardous materials
and is required to be placarded in accordance with
federal regulations.

f) Any size vehicle used in the transportation of any material
that requires hazardous materials placards or any
quantity of a material listed as a select agent or toxin in
42 CFR 73. Federal regulations through the Department
of Homeland Security require a background check and
fingerprinting for the Hazardous materials endorsement.

To get a CDL, you must pass knowledge and skills tests.
This manual will help you pass the tests. This manual is not a
substitute for a truck driver training class or program. Formal
training is the most reliable way to learn the many special
skills required for safely driving a large commercial vehicle
and becoming a professional driver in the trucking industry.
Figure 1.1 helps you determine if you need a CDL

Exemptions: You do not need a CDL to drive military equipment while in military uniform; certain fire and
emergency equipment owned by a fire company; or recreational vehicles; implements of husbandry; or
certain motorized construction equipment.

This section examines the requirements of the CDL and how you can get your CDL.

As part of the motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act, the Federal motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) amended
the Federal motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) to require interstate commercial driver’s license (CDL) holders,
subject to the physical qualification requirements of the FMCSRs, to provide a current copy of their medical Examiner’s
Certificate (also known as the U.S. DOT Physical card) to their State Driver Licensing Agency.

Interstate is defined as trade, traffic or transportation in the united States:

• Between a place in a State and place outside of such State (including a place outside of the united States); or

• Between two places in a State through another State or a place outside of the united States; or

• Between two places in a State as part of trade, traffic, or transportation originating or terminating outside
the State or the united States.